Alpha DC Pioneer Plus

Discussion in 'Badminton Stringing Techniques & Tools' started by Solarris, Mar 2, 2020.

  1. Solarris

    Solarris Regular Member

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    Sorry bout' my wording, I guide it. Tapping it is just using like a finger and applying a little pressure to get it moving... whoops :(
     
  2. LoaS

    LoaS Regular Member

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    Did you actually count the number of holes?
     
  3. Solarris

    Solarris Regular Member

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    OMG I found the problem. You guys were referencing this
    http://yonex.co.uk/products/badminton-stringing-instructions/
    I used this:
    http://www.yonexusa.com/products/badminton-stringing-instructions/

    Some rackets were on it and some were not...! That's why I thought mine was X pattern when it was not.
     
  4. s_mair

    s_mair Regular Member

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    That's what you should do, so don't worry. Just never push down on the bar once it has reached a stable position (in balance).
     
  5. LoaS

    LoaS Regular Member

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    These two websites show the same patterns. My advice is not to trust the racket model written there as there has been some inconsistencies in the past but count the number of holes and check the position of the shared grommets at the top. After some practice you'll be able to tell what pattern to use by with a quick look at the racket.
     
  6. Solarris

    Solarris Regular Member

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    Okay I redid the string and I am up to the part where it says down to B10 and tie off at B8.
    I’m watching this video around the 12:00 mark.


    So, you start the crosses before you finish the mains??
    Also I strung from A11, went to A10, down to B10, tension, and when it says tie off at B8, do you put the string through B8 and then tie off? Somehow he got the string coming out from inside the racket, so...
     
  7. Solarris

    Solarris Regular Member

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  8. s_mair

    s_mair Regular Member

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    Make it easy in the beginning and simply tie off the mains before you start the crosses. The way Alan is doing it in the video makes some things more convenient, but it also makes it more complex to follow in the beginning.

    Also, don’t bother with tying off at B8 and simply go with the Yonex recommendation. Same reason as above. The Yonex pattern is super straight forward so it’s a good starting point.
     
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  9. Solarris

    Solarris Regular Member

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    The Yonex recommendation is to tie off at B8.
     
  10. Solarris

    Solarris Regular Member

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    Wait so do you put the string from B10 into B8, so that the string is inside the racket, and then tie off? Like this:
    [​IMG]
    Is the Parnell knot applicable?
     
  11. s_mair

    s_mair Regular Member

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    Yes, that’s exactly how you tie off. How else would you do it? And yes, the Parnell is a perfectly fine knot. Once you’re used to it you can still try out other knots.
     
  12. Solarris

    Solarris Regular Member

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    [​IMG]
    2 hours and 26 minutes.
    Mains - 30m
    Cross- 1.5hr
    Shared holes - 30m

    the shared holes are so annoying lol.
    To be clear, the knots are:
    Main ends: Parnell
    Cross start: standard starting knot,YuLitle
    Cross end: double half hitch knot
    I don’t like double half hitch, it slipped a lot when I released tension. Or I just failed to do it.
     
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  13. s_mair

    s_mair Regular Member

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    There you go, congrats! You're now officially a stringer! :)
    The times needed are in the fully normal range. You'll get a lot(!) faster with the crosses and shared holes once you get more routine. If you haven't already, then watch those clips carefully and bookmark them:




    Once you have these techniqes internalised, you will be flying through the crosses in no time. Okay... that's a lie... but you know what I mean. And forget that double half hitch - doesn't bring any advantage compared to a Parnell.
     
  14. DuckFeet

    DuckFeet Regular Member

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    Congrats.
    I recommend looking up the Gudgeon knot.

    Sent from my SM-J510FN using Tapatalk
     
  15. Solarris

    Solarris Regular Member

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    Yeah, the 30m for conquering the shared holes was me watching the videos. In the end, I just cut all of the strings real pointy and brute force shove them in with pilers as leverage. Worked every time so.
    Crosses - I can't weave them (sad) so I would just manually insert it between each main. When I did weave them, I found that most of the time I missed one and had to redo the weave.

    Question: Let's say I was tensioning the mains. Halfway through the left/right side, the clamp slips and falls. Do I lose all tension on the strings?

    Another Question: For clamping the cross, could you use 2 clamps instead of one?

    Final Question: After stringing the racket, I realized I never had a need to use a flying clamp... but people still recommend them. Why?
     
  16. endFX

    endFX Regular Member

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    Keep practicing the weaving. Once you are used to it you can feel if you skipped a string without looking. You also will get much faster. Just try to keep relaxed hands and fingers and develope some kind of flow.

    To your questions:
    1 if the clamp slips you lose all tension in that string. All strings next to it will also drop tension but less. If it happens on the mains you should start over and tension all strings again.

    2 with fixed clamps you have to use one for the right and one for the left side. I'd say you only should use one clamp in each string.

    3 fixed clamps are generally better than flying clamps. Sometimes when you can't get close enough with the fixed ones the flying clamp can help. Also you can use them as a starting clamp
     
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  17. s_mair

    s_mair Regular Member

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    Flying clamps:
    Weaving is another thing you will get used to over time. It gets a lot easier and with less risk to make a mistake once you start using the "one ahead" technique as shown in the video above.
     

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