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Discussion in 'Chit-Chat' started by Loh, May 4, 2009.

  1. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Makeover for Chinatown Street Market

    Stalls sporting plastic awnings to be replaced with fire-safe box-like units



    Published on Jul 29, 2013
    7:38 AM



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    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/s...20130729/ST_20130729_VJTCHINTOWN_3767097e.jpg
    A mock-up of the shelter that will replace the plastic awnings of about 70 street stalls in Chinatown Street Market was erected two months ago outside Singapore Coins and Notes Museum on Pagoda Street. -- ST PHOTO: NURIA LING

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    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/straitstimes.com/files/20130729/28748810e.jpg
    The colourful plastic awnings of over 200 street stalls that display a range of goods is a familiar sight for both locals and tourists. Yet the distinctive look and feel of the Chinatown Street Market may be getting a makeover. A small concrete shelter has been erected outside the Singapore Notes and Coins Museum, along Pagoda street. It is a prototype being tested to see if the shelter is suited to replace the existing ones. -- ST PHOTO: NURIA LING


    By Janice Tai

    The distinctive look and feel of the Chinatown Street Market will soon be getting a makeover.

    About 70 shopfront street stalls - which are now marked by colourful plastic awnings - will operate out of box-like units equipped with their own shutters and fire safety system by 2015.

    A mock-up of the shelter, about the size of two toilet cubicles, was erected two months ago outside the Singapore Coins and Notes Museum on Pagoda Street.

    The new shelters will replace existing ones - made up of plastic canvas draped over zinc roofs - which are a potential fire hazard.
     
  2. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Queue system at upcoming Ng Teng Fong General Hospital to cut patient waiting time

    Published on Jul 27, 2013
    2:55 PM

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    Artist's impression of Ng Teng Fong General Hospital. A new queue system for patients at the upcoming Ng Teng Fong General Hospital will help cut waiting time by up to 40 per cent when the complex is completed next year. -- FILE PHOTO: JURONGHEALTH


    By Rachel Tan


    A new queue system for patients at the upcoming Ng Teng Fong General Hospital will help cut waiting time when the complex is completed next year.

    "The patient only needs to register once. The itinerary of the day can also be printed out with the queue number and this is the same queue number that one patient will use to move from one point to the next point," said Jurong Health chief executive Foo Hee Jug.

    The 'One Bill, One Queue' system is part of a patient-centric approach seen in a number of features and healthcare processes at upcoming 700-bed hospital is on track to open December 2014, with the adjacent Jurong Community Hospital opening in 2015.

    "Measured by turnaround time and waiting time, the queue management system can shorten waiting time about 30 to 40 per cent," said Jurong Health assistant chief operating officer Ng Kian Swan.
     
  3. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    More to benefit from Govt mobility fund for seniors

    TODAY

    By Ashley Chia



    37 min 21 sec ago

    SINGAPORE - Seniors who require Assistive Devices or subsidies for specialised transport and consumables can now tap on the enhanced Seniors’ Mobility and Enabling Fund (SMF) and have their applications approved at a much shorter time.

    Launched in 2011, the Government’s S$50 million injection into the fund - as announced in Budget 2013 - has widened the scope of coverage for seniors who need support to remain mobile and to live independently.

    The expansion now includes subsidies for consumable items like catheters, milk feeds and wound dressings for frail seniors receiving home-based healthcare services or attending a Singapore for Integrated Care for Elderly (SPICE) programme.

    Wheelchairs, commodes, spectacles and hearing aids can now be subsidised, as well as specialised transport services for wheelchair ambulant seniors to and from their home to the Day Rehabilitation Centre or Dialysis Centre.

    In addition, seniors attending Dementia Day Care Centres can also apply for the subsidy, regardless of their mobility status.

    Previously, consumables were not covered under the fund, and only walking sticks, rollators, basic wheelchairs and transport services for seniors receiving active rehabilitation at Day rehabilitation Centres funded by the Ministry of Health qualified for subsidies.

    More channels for seniors to apply for the fund have also been created which will enable the application process to be shortened.

    Seniors living in a 3-room HDB flat or smaller as per their NRIC address and receiving devices less that S$500 will automatically qualify for the 90 per cent subsidy. This simplified application process has replaced the previous household-means test.

    The Agency for Integrated Care (AIC), which used to be the only access point to the fund, has now partnered community-based service providers such as restructured hospitals, community hospitals, Day Rehab Centres, Dementia Day Care Centres, Renal Dialysis Centres, AIC’s SPICE centres, Senior Activity Centres and home-based healthcare providers to enable wider accessibility to the fund.

    There are now 114 access points for SMF islandwide and more will be made available “progressively.”
     
  4. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Social safety nets being strengthened: PM Lee

    [​IMG] PM
    Lee at the opening of Pek Kio Community Centre. Photo: Don Wong


    Pek Kio Community Centre, the first community centre to be co-located with a school, officially opened



    By Vimita Mohandas

    14 hours 33 min ago

    SINGAPORE — Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong has said the government is strengthening national safety nets and reviewing policies to help vulnerable groups more, adding that the community is also rallying together to address social needs and reaching out in ways that the government cannot do.

    He was speaking today (July 28) at the official opening of the Pek Kio Community Centre, the first community centre to be co-located with a school, Farrer Park Primary School.

    Mr Lee also stressed the importance of being self-reliant and working together to build a better tomorrow, as working together is even more important in our new phase as Singaporeans are living in a time of rapid change and uncertainty.

    He also said that while this will be an invigorating time for the young and people with skills (as there are more opportunities), there will be others who need more help.

    Mr Lee said: “There will be some who will find it difficult to adjust, especially the older Singaporeans and perhaps also, the lower income Singaporeans. They will need help to overcome the challenges they face. Whether it’s cost of living, the cost of healthcare, the widening income disparities, we need to focus on these people who need help and make sure that when we advance and move into the future, we all go together.”

    Mr Lee added that community centres act as a bridge to the community and to build community ties.

    Community centres are also a bridge to the future with brand new facilities such as a performing theatre, dance studios and an indoor sports hall.

    The Pek Kio Community Centre, which is also the first community centre (CC) to have a 200-seater performing theatre, will maximise community resources while promoting greater involvement in community activities by students and residents or parents in Pek Kio.

    Residents can also look forward to using the school’s indoor sports hall, concourse and field after school hours for community activities such as badminton, wushu and briskwalking.

    The new performing theatre, besides providing Farrer Park Primary School’s drama club with a well-equipped venue for performances, will also bring residents together through community arts and cultural activities and workshops.

    The new CC is also equipped with facilities, such as badminton courts, two dance studios, culinary room and music rooms.

    The indoor sports hall, badminton courts and field will be open to residents after school hours, and students in turn will be able to use the CC’s dance studios and other facilities during school hours.

    Students and residents will also be able to benefit from the new spacious culinary room and its stations, where they will be able to have hands-on sessions instead of watching demonstrations by the trainers. CHANNEL NEWSASIA
     
  5. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Singaporeans pessimistic? Nothing to feel down about

    Commentary

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    Today file photo


    By Joel Yang

    7 hours 50 min ago

    There is a case to be made as to how pessimism is perceived in Singapore, and how it is not necessarily a “bad” thing, in the way it has been stereotyped in a recent Gallup study.

    The poll shows that 24 per cent of a small sample of Singaporeans — which it takes as representative — rated their future lives as expected to be worse than their current lives. This has raised concern that Singaporeans are a pessimistic people. It also appears to reinforce an earlier survey by Gallup in 2011 which concluded that Singaporeans were the “least likely worldwide to report feeling positive emotions”.

    We need to understand the socio-cultural factors surrounding our take on pessimism; it is protective, and potentially empowering. Our memes — ideas and behaviours passed through our cultural evolution — play a major role in shaping our current perspectives. Culturally, it can be said that in Singapore, we are socialised from birth to be more cautious; to be humble; and to fear losing out, or being kiasu.

    Harking back to our migrant ancestors’ early years in Singapore, there was much uncertainty over the future and whether they would be able to eke out a decent living to support their families. They took huge risks in leaving their countries of birth to seek a better life, and to be cautious was a highly self-protective measure then.

    These memes have been passed down through the generations. From young, we were taught by our parents to err on the side of caution. We were told not to play too far from them and to never talk to strangers. We were warned when our dreams grew too big, and told that we ought to be happy with what we already had. Understandable advice given the context, but then it leads us to the admittance that we are a cautious people.

    Caution and pessimism, it has been pointed out, go hand in hand. A point in defence of caution and pessimism: In a German article published this year in the Psychology and Aging journal, it was noted that older people who were cautious and had low expectations for a satisfying future, were more likely to live longer and healthier lives than those who were less cautious.

    SEEKING SYMPATHY

    Secondly, we are raised to never brag about our accolades.

    Ask any Singaporean what their strengths are, and chances are they would take a while before responding. It does not speak to our low self-esteem, but instead to our self-censorship of what may be misinterpreted as bragging (being hao lian).

    Several Japanese researchers of the cultural notions of happiness have identified that there is connectedness through self-criticism. When one tells others how well he is doing at work, it may breed envy. However, when one confides in others the difficulties he faces at work, he may receive sympathy and others may engage more with him.

    We are not as likely to respond with an “awesome” or “great” when asked how we are. Instead, we are probably more likely to say, “Not so good, I’ve been stressed with work lately.” Even if we have just received a promotion, culturally, we are not shaped to go around telling everyone about it.

    BEING MORE REALISTIC

    Thirdly, we have been socialised to compete in all that we do with the fear of losing out (kiasu-ism) — the downside being to win at all costs.

    We need to recognise the utility of “defensive pessimism”, a term coined by psychologists Julie Norem and Nancy Cantor. This is essentially negative thinking that channels anxiety about potential failure into successful achievement. Singaporeans, being the practical people that we are, may be seen as pessimistic. However, a darker outlook on the future is often more realistic and can aid in making more accurate predictions.

    The concept of “defensive pessimism” draws all three points together. This can be seen in Singapore through us setting low expectations (being cautious), which softens the blow of failure. We all know of a former classmate who would walk out of the exam hall complaining about how they were going to fail, only to subsequently receive the highest grade in class.

    By focusing more on areas of potential pitfalls and not revealing our strengths (being humble), one can feel more in control of the situation. And finally, by reflecting on worst-case scenarios, we can prepare in advance to prevent failure from occurring (being kiasu).

    Can we build a sustainable nation for the future that is based on pessimism, some ask? The question is not a fair one. It would be more astute to challenge this stereotyped notion of pessimism.

    “Pessimism” as it is conventionally understood does not mean we Singaporeans are unhappy. Perhaps instead the Western notion of “pessimism” does not quite fit into our cultural definition of “happiness”.


    ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

    Dr Joel Yang is Head of the Master of Counselling Programme at the School of Human Development and Social Services, SIM University
     
    #7305 Loh, Jul 28, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2013
  6. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Schooling stronger, hungrier

    Sports



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    Schooling will contest the 200m freestyle, 100m and 200m fly, and 200m individual medley at the World Championships at the Palau Sant Jordi arena. TODAY file photo


    Teen swim star makes World Championships debut today in 200m free


    ByTan Yo-Hinn


    9 hours 10 min ago

    SINGAPORE — He no longer thinks about the incident that ruined the biggest race of his young career but Joseph Schooling has certainly not forgotten it.

    A year after his Olympic debut in London was scuppered by news minutes before his 200m butterfly heats that his equipment was not approved, the 18-year-old Singaporean says the experience remains a valuable lesson gained.

    Already making waves in the United States where he is based, Schooling is now hungry for more success.

    That could come at the 2013 FINA World Championships in Barcelona, where he will race in today’s 200m freestyle heats, an event for which he set the national record of 1min 49.47secs in May.

    “I don’t intend to just have one great swim. I intend on having multiple phenomenal swims so that no one can question my ability as a world class athlete,” he told TODAY.

    “If you have one breakout swim, people look at you differently. They expect more and more every time you dive into the pool and my goal is to keep upping that standard.”


    Schooling, who will also contest the 100m and 200m fly and 200m individual medley, added: “This is the perfect opportunity for me to make a scene on the world stage.”

    However, his preparations were temporarily affected after his valuables, including his cellphone, were stolen last week during a training camp in Girona on the outskirts of Barcelona.

    At the London Games, Schooling’s debut was marred by an official telling him just minutes before his 200m fly heats that his cap and goggles were not approved by the sport’s world body FINA, despite earlier checks, and he went on to post a disappointing 1:59.18, some way off his personal best of 1:56.67.

    This time around, the holder of five individual national records and defending 200m fly South-east Asian (SEA) champion insists he is stronger.

    “In a way, I’m happy I went through that because that reminds me life isn’t a fairytale and you can’t overlook the small things and expect every moment to be the way you want it to be,” he said.


    “It definitely is part of my routine now. I check the approved list myself and I double-check with my coach.”

    Since the London setback, Schooling has bounced back to post a series of impressive results — including winning the 200m fly in 1:57.79 at the Arena Swimming Grand Prix in Charlotte, North Carolina, in May — with many American universities keen to snap him up when he graduates from Bolles next year.

    For now, Schooling only has the World Championships on his mind.

    He said: “I’ve been racing well this whole year and I’ve seen a change in my swimming. Hopefully, I can carry this momentum into Barcelona and do something special.”

    At the competition yesterday, Tao Li, 23, reached the semi-finals of the women’s 100m fly when she clocked 58.94secs in the heats to be ranked 13th out of the 52-strong field, with Olympic champion Dana Vollmer of the US the fastest qualifier (57.22secs). Tao, a two-time Asian Games 50m fly champion, was in action in the semi-finals at press time last night.
     
  7. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    First dedicated paediatric and dementia wards at new Assisi Hospice

    Published on Jul 29, 2013
    12:36 PM

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    Artist’s impression of the new Assisi Hospice, which will be located close to its current Thomson Road site. When the new and much bigger Assisi Hospice opens in 2016, it will have Singapore's first dedicated paediatric and dementia wards. -- PHOTO: NEW SPACE ARCHITECTS


    By Salma Khalik

    When the new and much bigger Assisi Hospice opens in 2016, it will have Singapore's first dedicated paediatric and dementia wards.

    Aside from more than doubling the number of beds - from 37 to 85 - the new building will also have a section dedicated to education and training in palliative and bereavement care for staff, volunteers and carers.

    The place will be built with a homely atmosphere, with "kopitiam"-type dining area for patients and their family to mingle, and a balcony in every room.

    Health Minister Gan Kim Yong, who participated at the groundbreaking ceremony on Monday, together with Archbishop William Goh, said: "The challenge is to build a hospice that can feel like a home, so that patients who are unable to be supported at home can have a peaceful and restful place to spend their final days meaningfully."
     
  8. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Scientists identify gene that worsens breast cancer

    S'pore team hopes to team up with drug firms to develop targeted treatment



    Published on Jul 27, 2013
    9:00 AM


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    Scientists in Singapore have identified a gene which makes an aggressive form of breast cancer even worse, in a development which could lead to more effective drugs to treat it. -- ST FILE PHOTO: NEO XIAOBIN


    By Feng Zengkun

    Scientists in Singapore have identified a gene which makes an aggressive form of breast cancer even worse, in a development which could lead to more effective drugs to treat it.

    Patients with triple negative breast cancer, whose tumours have high levels of a gene called UBASH3B, are likely to have earlier relapses within three years of treatment.

    Scientists at the Agency for Science, Technology and Research's Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) also said these patients' cancer is more virulent and spreads faster in the body.

    Triple negative breast cancer gets its name because its tumours lack estrogen, progesterone and HER2, which are common in other types of cancer.


    Background story

    Triple negative breast cancer affects 15 per cent to 20 per cent of patients with breast cancer - the most common cancer among women here, making up three in 10 cancer diagnoses.
     
  9. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Singapore must guard against elitism: Goh Chok Tong

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    Photo: Ooi Boon Keong


    Emeritus Senior Minister Goh warns that elitism threatens to divide the inclusive society Singapore is seeking to build

    28 July

    SINGAPORE — Emeritus Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong said yesterday (July 27) there is a need to guard against elitism because it threatens to divide the inclusive society Singapore is seeking to build.

    Speaking at his alma mater Raffles Institution's (RI) Homecoming event, Mr Goh said top schools must play a key role in ensuring that their students do not develop an elitist mindset and a sense of entitlement.

    Mr Goh is the second recipient of the Gryphon Award, an honour given to RI's most distinguished alumni.

    The first Gryphon Award was given to former Minister Mentor Lee Kuan Yew in 2011.

    Mr Goh spent six years in RI in the 1950s and he recalled it to be a melting pot of Singapore's best male students from different racial and religious backgrounds, whether they were rich or poor.

    He said his generation's experience was that of an open meritocracy that meant "equity and upward social mobility for most people."

    However, as the society matured, Mr Goh said some stratification is inevitable and income inequality has grown over the years.

    While he said it is natural and commendable for families to give their children a head start, he also cautioned against having a sense of entitlement.

    Mr Goh said: "When society's brightest and most able think that they made good because they are inherently superior and entitled to their success; when they do not credit their good fortune also to birth and circumstance; when economic inequality gives rise to social immobility and a growing social distance between the winners of meritocracy and the masses; and when the winners seek to cement their membership of a social class that is distinct from, exclusive, and not representative of Singapore society — that is elitism."

    Mr Goh said the solution is not to replace meritocracy.

    However, the practice of meritocracy must not worsen the divide between the successful and the rest of the society.

    Mr Goh said: "Those of us who have benefited disproportionately from society's investment in us owe the most to society, particularly to those who may not have had access to the same opportunities. We owe a debt to make lives better for all and not just for ourselves."

    He said the government will also have to continue to intervene through policies and programmes, benefiting those whose families have fallen behind economically.

    These efforts, Mr Goh said, will ensure Singapore's brand of meritocracy remains compassionate, fair and inclusive.

    Mr Goh also launched the Raffles Community Initiative, which is worth more than S$500,000.

    The initiative will serve as seed funding for community projects by students and alumni. CHANNEL NEWSASIA
     
  10. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Myanmar-born, but SAF Overseas Scholarship recipient driven to serve

    SAF Overseas Scholarship recipient fought to persuade reluctant parents


    Published on Jul 30, 2013
    8:54 AM

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    Officer cadets (from left) Lim Yu Han, Maung Thet Naing Win and Jonathan Loh You Qing, all 19, are among eight who received the SAF Overseas Scholarship at a ceremony yesterday. -- ST PHOTO: ALPHONSUS CHERN


    By David Ee

    When Myanmar-born Maung Thet Naing Win, 19, first told his parents in 2011 of his wish to pursue a career with the Singapore Armed Forces, they instinctively baulked at the idea.

    Having grown up and lived under the harsh rule of the former Myanmar military junta, they were adamant that their son not become a military man.

    But officer cadet (OCT) Maung, who moved to Singapore with his family when he was just a year old and became a citizen in 2008, persevered at convincing them.

    Yesterday, he became one of this year's eight recipients of the prestigious SAF Overseas Scholarship (Safos) in a ceremony at the Istana.


    Background story

    CALL OF DUTY
    I also convinced my dad that his job stability depended on Singapore's peace and stability, and that in part comes from the SAF.

    - Myanmar-born officer cadet Maung Thet Naing Win, 19, whose parents lived under the harsh rule of the former Myanmar military junta and did not want him to become a military man
     
  11. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Rare sea turtle spotted on beach at East Coast Park

    Published on Jul 30, 2013
    8:54 AM


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    The turtle - believed to be a hawksbill - was spotted near East Coast Lagoon Food Centre on July 21. It heaved itself back into the sea about an hour later, without laying any eggs. Hawksbills and green turtles are the two species most commonly sighted here, and both are critically endangered. -- PHOTO: DAVID TAN


    By Grace Chua


    When biology undergraduate David Tan got a call telling him that a sea turtle had been spotted at East Coast Park, he found himself wrestling with two conflicting impulses.

    While he wanted a rare glimpse of the endangered creature laying its eggs, he was also wary of disturbing it.

    "Excitement got the better of me," said the 24-year-old. After hearing of the sighting from a friend earlier this month, he headed straight to the spot, near East Coast Lagoon Food Centre.

    When he arrived after midnight, the keen naturalist saw the creature being watched from a safe distance by several other people, most of whom were National Parks Board (NParks) staff.
     
  12. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    S'pore team win International Young Physicists tournament

    By Victoria JenPOSTED: 30 Jul 2013 8:15 PM

    The team of five students, aged between 16 and 17, beat 25 other teams from around the world to clinch the gold medal in the competition, also known as the "Physics World Cup."


    TAIPEI: A Singapore team has won this year's International Young Physicists' Tournament held in Taiwan.

    This is the second time that Singapore has clinched the gold medal in the competition, also known as the "Physics World Cup."

    The team of five students, aged between 16 and 17, beat 25 other teams from around the world.

    Singapore last won the gold medal in 2010.

    This is the fifth year that Singapore has taken part in the competition,
    Singapore's team coach Lee Jie Liang said: "I think they are a very committed bunch with all the time that they put into this competition. They never complained. When they know they need to conduct experiment or stay longer hours in the lab, they are always happy to do so."

    President Ma Ying-jeou also met with the Singapore team at the presidential office.


    Channel NewsAsia has been following the Singapore team's preparations for the competition and a documentary will be aired on August 22.



    - CNA/fa
     

    Attached Files:

  13. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    New PE syllabus from 2014; secondary school students to learn at least 3 recreational

    Published on Jul 31, 2013
    10:45 AM


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    A netball game in action at Ang Mo Kio Secondary School. The Education Ministry will roll out a new physical education (PE) syllabus from next year. -- FILE PHOTO: ANG MO KIO SECONDARY


    By Stacey Chia


    The Education Ministry will roll out a new physical education (PE) syllabus from next year.

    As part of the new syllabus all students will have to take part in outdoor education and secondary school students will learn at least three recreational sports so that they can take part in intra-school competitions. Health education lessons will also be integrated into PE lessons at all levels.

    Primary 1 and 2, as well as Secondary 1 and 2 students, will be the first to experience the new syllabus next year.

    The new syllabus was announced by Education Minister Heng Swee Keat at the second Physical and Sports Education Conference on Wednesday. Mr Heng said that the new syllabus aims to equip students with the ability to engage in a wide range of physical activities and sports. He said that some of the changes are a result of feedback received from Our Singapore Conversation sessions. Workshops will be held to help schools teach the new syllabus.
     
  14. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    S’pore swimmer Schooling sets national 200m fly record

    By Tan Yo-Hinn -

    3 hours 51 min ago

    SINGAPORE -- United States-based swimmer Joseph Schooling has set a national record for the men’s 200m butterfly.



    The 18-year-old Singaporean clocked 1min 56.27secs in the event’s first semi-final at the FINA World Swimming Championship in Barcelona on Tuesday (July 30, early Wednesday morning, Singapore time).

    It bettered the previous mark of 1:56.67 which he set at the 2011 South-east Asian (SEA) Games in Indonesia.


    However, it was not enough for him to qualify for the final today after he was ranked 10th overall, with Tom Luchsinger of the United States taking the eighth and final berth in 1:56.10.

    South African Chad Le Clos, who won the event at last year’s London Olympics, is the fastest qualifier for today’s final after posting a 1:55.33.
     
  15. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    16 applications from singles for every two-room flat on offer

    Published on Jul 31, 2013
    2:27 PM


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    HDB Build-To-Order (BTO) flats under construction at Sengkang Central. Barely a day after the latest BTO launch and there were already about 16 applications from singles for every two-room flat on offer. -- ST FILE PHOTO: SEAH KWANG PENG




    By Daryl Chin


    Barely a day after the latest Build-To-Order (BTO) launch and there were already about 16 applications from singles for every two-room flat on offer.

    The latest figures, posted on the Housing Board's website at 2pm on Wednesday, showed that the 231 units in Sengkang were more popular than the units on offer in Yishun.

    [​IMG]
    A total of 519 two-room flats were launched with up to a third being set aside specifically for singles. This is the first time singles are able to bid for brand new public flats. Previously they were restricted to the resale market.
     
  16. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Raffles Institution wins first place in Straits Times Big Quiz again

    Published on Jul 31, 2013
    7:09 PM

    By Sheryl Quek


    It was a 30-point "sabo" that gave Raffles Institution (RI) the edge it needed to clinch the championship in The Big Quiz - for the second time in a row.

    In the finals of The Straits Times-Ministry of Education National Current Affairs Quiz, the NYJC team had directed its question to RI using its "Sabo King" card, as part of its strategy. RI correctly answered this question: Which is the first woman author to win the Man Booker Prize twice? The answer: Hilary Mantel.

    The team held on to its lead, eventually scoring 210 points to beat Hwa Chong Institution, which scored 180 points, for first place. After weeks of intense competition, RI won $5,000 and a trophy in the second edition of The Big Quiz. The finals were held at the Grand Copthorne Waterfront Hotel on Wednesday. Third place went to River Valley High School while Nanyang Junior College came in fourth.

    The event was organised by The Straits Times and the Ministry of Education. It was sponsored by Singapore Press Holdings Foundation and innovation partner Shell. The guest-of-honour was Senior Minister of State (law and education) Ms Indranee Rajah.

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    The participating teams take a photo with The Straits Times associate editor Sumiko Tan and guest-of-honour Senior Minister of State (law and education) Ms Indranee Rajah after the finals of The Straits Times-Ministry of Education National Current Affairs Quiz on Wednesday, July 31, 2013. It was a 30-point "sabo" that gave Raffles Institution the edge it needed to clinch the championship in The Big Quiz - for the second time in a row. -- ST PHOTO: KEVIN LIM
     
  17. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Swimming: Schooling sets new 200m IM national mark at the World Championships


    Published on Jul 31, 2013
    6:36 PM


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    Singapore's Joseph Schooling competes in the heats of the men's 200m butterfly swimming event in the Fina World Championships in Barcelona on Tuesday, July 30, 2013. Schooling became the first Singaporean to go below the two-minute barrier in the 200m individual medley, when he clocked 1min 59.99sec at the World Championships in Barcelona, on Wednesday, July 31, 2013, breaking his own national record of 2:00.77. -- PHOTO: AFP



    By Chan U-Gene

    SINGAPORE swimmer Joseph Schooling became the first Singaporean to go below the two-minute barrier in the 200m individual medley, when he clocked 1min 59.99sec at the World Championships in Barcelona, on Wednesday, breaking his own national record of 2:00.77.

    He also took the last slot in tonight's semi-finals in 16th position. The fastest qualifier was Hungarian Laszlo Cseh in 1:57.70.

    Meanwhile, Danny Yeo came close to his own national record of 50.51 seconds in the 100m freestyle, when he clocked 50.92 to finish 40th out of 86 swimmers. Quah Ting Wen also missed out on the semi-finals. Her time of 2:14.10 in the women's 200m butterfly put her 21st out of 26 competitors.


    Singapore's Joseph Schooling qualifies for 200m men's butterfly semis
    Published on Jul 30, 2013
    5:02 PM





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    Singaporean swimmer Joseph Schooling competes in the men's 200m butterfly heat of the London Olympics in London on July 30, 2012. Schooling qualified for the semi-finals of the men's 200m butterfly at the Fina World Championships in Barcelona on Tuesday, July 30, 2013. -- ST FILE PHOTO: MUGILAN RAJASEGERAN


    By Fabius Chen

    Singapore swimmer Joseph Schooling qualified for the semi-finals of the men's 200m butterfly at the Fina World Championships in Barcelona on Tuesday.

    The 18-year-old clocked 1min 57.23sec to rank 14th out of the 35-strong field.


    He will take to the pool again in the semi-finals early Wednesday morning (Singapore time).

    Meanwhile, Quah Ting Wen failed in her bid to reach the semi-finals of the women's 200m freestyle. The Singaporean's time of 2min 2.57sec saw her rank 29th out of 45 swimmers.
     
    #7317 Loh, Jul 31, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2013
  18. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Swimming: No final for Schooling

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    Schooling has set new national records in the 200m butterfly and 200m individual medley. Photo: Getty Images


    Hopes dashed after 18-year-old eventually finished last out of 16 swimmers with a semi-final time of 2min 00.49sec

    TODAY

    By Low Lin Fhoong

    5 hours 19 min ago

    SINGAPORE - Despite a lung-bursting sprint to the finish, national swimmer Joseph Schooling's dream of competing in the FINA World Championship's men's 200m individual medley final alongside 2012 Olympics silver and bronze medallists Ryan Lochte and Hungary's Laszlo Cseh was dashed early Thursday morning.

    Hopes had been high for the 18-year-old to replicate his record-breaking performance of 1min 59.99sec from yesterday's (July 31) heats, but Schooling eventually finished last out of 16 swimmers with a semi-final time of 2min 00.49sec.

    Still, there is no denying that the teenager has been one of the Republic's best performers at the world meet after setting new national records in the 200m IM and 200m butterfly in the space of 15 hours.

    His feats mean that he is on course to meet his target of setting personal best times for all the four events he is contesting in his World Championships debut.

    Joseph's new national record during his 200m IM heat also makes him the first Singaporean to go below the two-minute mark for the event.

    He had set the previous national mark of 2:00.77 in May at the Arena Grand Prix in Charlotte, North Carolina.

    Schooling, who will start his final year at Bolles School in Jacksonville following the world championships, will compete in his final event, the men’s 100m butterfly heats, at the Palau Sant Jordi sporting arena tomorrow.

    Singapore’s other swimmers failed to make it out of the heats in their respective events with Tao Li clocking 28.90secs in the 50m backstroke to finish 24th out of 51 athletes.
     
  19. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Programme to transform SMEs become global players

    WDA’s 360 Productivity Initiative launched today aims to help about 700 local enterprises boost economic competitiveness


    16 min 43 sec ago

    SINGAPORE — A new initiative has been launched to help small and medium enterprises become globally competitive companies by enhancing their productivity.

    The 360 Productivity initiative is being spearheaded by the Workforce Development Agency, the Employment and Employability Institute and the Human Capital Singapore. It was launched by Minister of State for Manpower, Dr Amy Khor, today (Aug 1).

    The WDA and Human Capital Singapore says some 700 local enterprises will stand to benefit from the scheme, which is targeted at these companies to explore and utilise productivity from every angle there by boosting their economic competitiveness amidst a tight labour market.

    It is an holistic effort that comprises an annual productivity event, a series of master classes and eight productivity practice sessions. The master class will bring in internationally renowned thought leaders to share their latest thinking and trends about productivity.

    During productivity practice sessions, managers will come together to share and learn productivity initiatives. There will also be a productivity award for breakthroughs so as to recognise and commend companies for their efforts directed at raising their productivity.
    Envoys from the Enterprise Support Scheme or ETS were also appointed this morning.

    These envoys are senior management representatives who will help champion capability development through the continuing education and training programmes and the adoption of the workforce skills qualifications programmes.

    The envoys will help promote the uptake of the enterprise support scheme within their industry sectors through referrals and the sharing of experiences.

    The scheme came into effect on April 1 this year. It helps companies implement progressive human resource systems and enhances in-house training capabilities to help raise skills and productivity of workers Since 20 June this year, six organisations have signed up for the scheme. CHANNEL NEWSASIA
     
  20. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    STTA ties up with Liverpool university for players’ studies

    Retired national table tennis players will be able to pursue degrees at University of Liverpool under MoU signed today


    • By Gerard Wong

      32 min 9 sec ago

      SINGAPORE — National table tennis players can now choose to further their studies at the University of Liverpool after they retire from the sport.

      The Singapore Table Tennis Association today (Aug 1) inked a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the British educational institution, which now becomes the latest university to partner the national sports body after Singapore’s own Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and China’s Beijing University.
     

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