position of racket head when swinging forehand

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by brandonL, Jul 10, 2022.

  1. brandonL

    brandonL New Member

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    When hitting a forehand shot, be it a clear or a smash, do you let the racket face looking at the net or being parallel to the net (racket head facing the side) ?


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  2. BadmintonDave

    BadmintonDave Regular Member

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    At the point of impact, you want the racquet head facing the direction you want the shot to go.

    Here's a picture I drew in paint.

    upload_2022-7-11_10-20-24.png

    Make sure you know the basics. "V" grip for overhead shots. Be relaxed. If the shuttle doesn't travel in a straight line, it's likely your grip is slightly off (therefore racquet head not being correct when contact made).
     
  3. brandonL

    brandonL New Member

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    yes, V grip is the correct way for a quality forehand shot. but which way should the racket face when smashing? [​IMG]
    in the first pic, you can see the athlete holds the racket face sideways when hitting a smash.

    [​IMG]

    and in the second pic, jonatan christie holds the racket with the face of the racket pointing to the front instead of the side like the first pic.

    which one is the correct one you reckon?


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  4. kenneth77

    kenneth77 Regular Member

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    Not quite sure I understand what you're asking. When you hit the shuttle be it clear or smash, you want your racket facing the direction you want it to go. The pictures you're using have the players already in the process of swinging so may not be good examples.
     
  5. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    He is showing two players in what could perhaps be described as a preparation phase of their swing, (would you agree?), but their racket faces are pointing differently and he is asking about that
     
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  6. brandonL

    brandonL New Member

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    correct, thank you very much.


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  7. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    I very much doubt anybody would say a player at that level is doing their racket prep wrong, and they're probably right to not say so..'cos there's probably good reason for why the racket is in a different orientation there.. The scenario might be slightly different, I notice that in the top pic he is looking less up.. so maybe the shuttle is a bit wider. And in the bottom pic, it's a bit less wide.. Though I can't say that explains it. It's also possible that it's not exactly the same point in the swing.

    Nobody would say it was wrong unless perhaps they noticed that he made more errors when preparing it one way than preparing it another way. But probably only the coaches of whatever top player are going to know that.

    But can you provide a link to the video and the timeframes., So then it's possible to see the whole swing (e.g. in what ways if any, were the swings different), and the footwork getting there and where contact was made with the shuttle.

    Maybe some people here might have some thoughts regarding it..

    One of the ways, even the main way, people talk about "what's right", is looking at what top international players are doing.. (and some might look at what national or even regional level players are doing 'cos it might be easier to emulate than top international).
     
  8. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    I don’t think Jonatan’s racquet is completely face on. It’s still turned to the side a little bit.

    My preference would be to prepare the racquet like Jonatan. It’s a bit easier to play a full range of shots for singles.

    You notice both pictures that the racquet shaft is pointing quite straight up towards the ceiling with the v grip. This is much more important for the preparation. Using it means you can do a very quick stroke speed which is important for deception.

    There are a few top players who don’t point the racquet straight to the ceiling. Those are very few.
     
  9. kenneth77

    kenneth77 Regular Member

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    Ok, I understand now. My prep would be somewhat similar to Jonatan where I keep my racquet face generally facing the net. I find I make less mistakes this way.
     
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  10. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    I'm not good with faces. Who is the guy in the green shirt? and do you know which match it was?
     
  11. brandonL

    brandonL New Member

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    its Goh V shem, i watched a compilation video of his forehand smash, everytime he wants to hit a smash shot, he always set the racket face to the side before hitting.


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  12. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    okay, I just watched a video.. and I see it looks like any smash where he has time for a full swing, he's doing that..

    and it's working for him, because even though he starts in that position(pic to the left), at some point after, he gets his racket to this kind of position, (pic to the right)

    [​IMG]


    He can do that so it's fine and great.

    But many people if beginner level, if they have their racket face out to start with, then they'll swing their racket round at the shuttle. or do something funny.. (Though they could probably benefit from learning how to swing properly even when their racket prep starts out to the side).

    So racket preparations i've heard taught are more facing the net, or a bit closed inward.. and not open to the extreme out very to the side like he has it..But they could teach it facing out to the side too.

    So, it's a really interesting finding you made there..

    It's interesting 'cos people often face their racket face out naturally but are often coached to not do that

    Of course also.. he has his body really turned well, and is still able to then turn into it..

    Nobody would ever say he was doing it wrong.. And if you held your racket in the preparation position that he is, and somebody said that was wrong, then you can show them the images of that guy, and if they agree you're holding it like he is, then they couldn't say it was wrong. They could say they don't coach it like that, but they couldn't say it was wrong! Rule number 1 in showing that something is good technique is finding a top international player doing it! Those types of people set the standard.
     
    #12 ralphz, Jul 12, 2022
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2022
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  13. brandonL

    brandonL New Member

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    yeah thanks for the clarification, also if you look at Marcus Fernaldi Gideon's smash, he also prepares the racket head facing the side, although not as extreme as goh v shem.


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  14. badliker

    badliker Regular Member

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    When bracing for the smash itself, it's rather common to not have your racket facing straight. All that matters is when you have impact with the shuttle, your racket head is facing towards the place you want to hit it.
    Top players do this as well, but when you see still-shots of their preparation for a smash, it's just how they feel comfortable posturing themselves. They all do the same movement in the end: Rotating your underarm. This is the key for a good smash, rotation in the underarm!
    A good example is Lee Zii Jia, who basically never hits a full-movement smash, but he makes use of the underarm-rotation so well!

    Another reason they tend to hold the racket facing sideways before smashing, is that it's just more comfortable. And it's way easier to relax that way. Try holding your arm up in a smash position, and angle your wrists so your rackets are facing forwards, and then switch to sideways.
    You should feel it's more natural for you to relax facing sideways
     
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  15. Simeon

    Simeon Regular Member

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    Racket is facing more or less to the side on those photos. But that is not the point, but what happens after that. The same racket face will look to the left as well a split of a second before it will turn back facing the net and the shuttle when hitting, but even after hitting the turning goes on. If you don't feel the constant movement through the shuttle you will end up pushing the racket like girls throwing a tennis ball, excuse me.
     
  16. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    For proper windup for pronation, the racket will initially face out (right for a righty) when at the top of the swing. Then it'll turn inwards and face in (left for a righty) when the racket falls behind the head/back in the next phase of windup.

    You don't intentionally do this. It should happen naturally.

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