NEWS : Cocky Chen Hong just loves himself

Discussion in 'Singapore / Indonesia / Malaysia Open 2003' started by seven, Aug 25, 2003.

  1. seven

    seven New Member

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    Cocky Chen Hong just loves himself

    After retaining title, world No. 1 hardly talks about anyone else

    By Peh Shing Huei

    CHEN HONG must be incurably in love with himself, after retaining the Yonex-Sunrise Singapore Open men's singles title yesterday. With unabashed narcissism, the Chinese world No 1 and top seed found it hard to talk about anything - except himself, after beating unseeded compatriot Chen Yu 11-15, 15-8, 15-4 in the final.

    Who would he dedicate the win to?

    'Myself', he replied.

    Who was his toughest opponent in this five-star event?

    'Myself.'

    And what led to his losing the first game?

    'I was too slow.'

    Except saying that Yu 'played well', the 24-year-old hardly bothered to give his younger opponent any mention, or credit, for taking a game off him.

    He added: 'I deserved to win. I think I played quite well in this tournament.'

    After a commanding week at the Singapore Indoor Stadium, it is perhaps not surprising that the cocky Hong feels that the world revolves around him.

    Despite a tough draw, the defending champion had cantered into the final without too much fuss.

    Malaysian All-England champion Mohammad Hafiz Hashim was packed off in straight games in the first round. England's Colin Haughton wasted only 30 minutes of his time in the next round.

    Singapore's hero Ronald Susilo bothered him for 45 minutes in the quarter-finals and compatriot Lin Dan did not pose too much threat in Saturday's semi-finals.

    In fact, the game that Hong lost to Yu yesterday was the first one he conceded the whole week.

    But the 22-year-old Yu, overwhelmed by the pressure of being in his first Grand Prix final, was not able to sustain his charge in front of 3,800 spectators.

    Said a sullen Yu: 'I wanted to win too badly. By the second game, I was just too mentally tired to challenge him anymore.'

    Yu, who beat Hong in an internal competition last month, looked like he could pull off another upset when he took the first game.

    The world No 26 kept pace with the quick Hong and troubled him repeatedly with precise sharp-angled smashes to the sidelines.

    Though Hong's rocket-like half-smashes were dangerous, Yu's stingers along the edges put him one-game up.

    But, after changing sides, the force of Yu's attacks were softened by Hong's superior control at the net.

    Hong's repertoire of cross-court flicks, lifts and clears at the net gave him a 13-5 advantage and, though Yu narrowed the gap to 13-8, Hong comfortably held on to level the match.

    The less-experienced Yu did not learn his lesson in the rubber. He continued to engage Hong at the net, failed miserably, and was quickly thrashed 15-4.

    He pocketed US$6,800 (S$11,800), while Hong became US$13,600 richer.

    Said Yu: 'I did not move him around the court, and my flat returns just allowed him to come at me too easily.

    'I could only play as well as he let me. I just hope I don't meet him again at this week's Indonesian Open.

    'This may be my best performance ever, but I want to be the champion.

    'Now, I just feel like a failure.'

    Looks like Hong's self-love did not rub off on his opponent.
     
  2. whizkelv

    whizkelv Regular Member

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    Well, if Chen Hong manages to overcome Indonesia next week, then he really deserved to be acknowledged as the best in this new millennium.:)
     
  3. Bbn

    Bbn Regular Member

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    Can't blame Ch for trying to console himself after his

    failures in World Champs, Sudirman and J Open.

    I think he feels very relaxed in Singapore (calls it 2nd home).

    I think he plays to the crowd whilst in Singapore (like Zhao)

    like using trick shots, Saying thank you to Chen Yu when later hit out a smash, and

    didn't shake CY's hand after winning.

    CH and Xia I think have a bit of star quality about them, like Dong Jiong?
     
  4. Han

    Han Regular Member

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    Why not?

    The bottom line is he won. Chen Hong can say whatever he want as long as he contunues to win and rightly so. Even though many has beaten Chen Hong before but he's always up there consistently. I still rate Chen Hong as #1 in the world, not Xia and certainly not Choon Hann.
     
  5. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Yes Chen Hong is in LOVE!

    Not only with himself, to prove that he is confident, but more importantly, with China's women's doubles world champion, Gao Ling. It was reported that the two love-birds were seen together in intimate moments at the recent S'pore Open. They get the blessings of China's assistant head coach, Tian Bingyi, who said "They are of the age when they should be falling in love. I'm very happy for them and I wish them all the best". Let's hope that their relationship will be long lasting, unlike Peter Gade and Camilla Martin's.

    It also looks like Chen Hong loves Singapore. During the Preliminaries (Rounds 2 & 3), at about 8.00 pm, I was getting hungry and went out to a nearby food court for a meal. Not long after, Chen Hong, in his red and white jersey strode in casually with two of his Chinese friends. Would you believe it, he ordered fried rice and three other dishes all for himself when he is supposed to be playing Round 3 at around 9.30 pm! He certainly looked very much at home being able to converse in his native Mandarin with the Chinese stall holder.

    Well, I missed the opportunity of taking a pic with him as I had no camera with me nor did I get his autograph. You can say I met him face to face and he sat two tables away from me! I don't think such an opportunity will recur.
     
  6. Kaffie

    Kaffie Regular Member

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    Well, I was sitting with the players and I overheard some of the girls from the China team asking Gaoling for a treat using the prize money, Gaoling was talking to Chen Hong then, but she quickly replied, "no I can't do that, we need to save for our wedding." :D

    It also seems that the Chinese coach don't really like their players, taking pics with fans or signing autograph, cos the coach was chiding Xia for wasting his time taking pics and signing autograph instead of watching how the game. :rolleyes:
     
  7. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Didn't he use hokkien?
     
  8. wilfredlgf

    wilfredlgf Regular Member

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    Hokkien? :confused:
    I think the Hokkien from China will definitely by very different from the one in SEA. Even in Malaysia there are already three types of spoken Hokkien that I know of.
     
  9. Bbn

    Bbn Regular Member

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    Ha ha, I think the younger generation in China/Taiwan/Singapore cant even speak

    a word of Hokkien.I think its going to be the same in Msia one generation later,

    They''ll either speak mandarin or Malay and maybe some English.

    In Singapore/Taiwan, I think speaking Hokkien is tantamount to declaring oneself

    an uneducated heartlander.

    Even Fujian province has a big population of Foochous, you cant understand a word,

    sounds Japanese. Even not all Guandong people know Cantonese, there is a big

    population of Teochews.

    Maybe HK will follow the same path.
     
  10. Bbn

    Bbn Regular Member

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    Alan Tai qualifies for main and gets the privilege

    of playing Chen Hong if he beats the Japanese.

    Last time in Msia Open AT lost 2 & 3 to Bao.
     
  11. Adel

    Adel Regular Member

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    The thread has changed: SORRY!

    Yup, Bbn's right there.

    I'm (sadly) one of those Singaporean-Chinese of Hokkien descent that cannot really speak the dialect, save for those wonderful swearing words. My listening is good enough to decipher when my parents are talking bad about me but I am not fluent enough to respond.

    The local govt doesn't encourage the use of Chinese dialects coz it supposedly impedes the kids from learning Mandarin ie. putonghua but IMHO, many Singaporean-Chinese are already bad at Mandarin with or without the use of dialects.

    And it's def. right to say that many ppl consider Hokkien a low-classed language only for the uneducated which, to me is ridiculous, coz there's no such thing as a superior or inferior language.

    As for CH.... I can't comment on whether or not he is cocky based on the interview alone. For all I know, he may be jesting but such things can be interpreted wrongly, esp. when translated into another language.

    But I like to think that a true champion has the humility to boot - and it's not just badminton I'm talking about.
     
  12. Bbn

    Bbn Regular Member

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    Well, Adel Msia is slowly phasing out Chinese programs in dialect

    and to have them dubbed in Mandarin. No more of the

    flowery cantonese frm HK.

    Anyway there's a change in trend in Msia, people in recent years tend to watch

    more programs made in China .

    Dunno whether good or bad, but one can watch any program in any dialect

    on satelitte Tv on WAh Loi Toi, TVBS or Phoenix.

    Maybe one day you can be a public relations exec for Samsung Hyundai or LG or Sth.
     
  13. seven

    seven New Member

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    Seems to be the same problem as we have here... I live in Occitania and can hardly speak a word of Occitan (same as many people of my generation).

    Everyone speaks French + all TV programs are in French...

    And we have no badminton on TV !!! :mad: (throw it away! ;) )
     
  14. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Dialects & Languages

    Funny thing about language is that many people try to learn a new language and forget their own mother tongue. This is especially true when a language has economic and political value in one's country.

    In my case, as it continues to be today, English was very important during my time as the British was then the colonial masters and good jobs demanded that you must know that language. Chinese (Mandarin) was 'unimportant' as it has less economic value unless you worked for the rich Chinese towkays or businessmen and in the government schools, Chinese was a non-examination subject unlike today.

    So my English is stronger than my mother tongue, which my siblings and I used to converse with our parents who are more literate in Chinese. But our Cantonese is no way near the high standards spoken by the Hongkong people because they are writing and speaking it at the same time and Cantonese is used as a medium of instruction in most schools. (I don't know whether this has been replaced by Mandarin as influenced by China or English in some schools?). My siblings and I don't write Chinese or read Chinese newspapers.

    But ever since we gained our independence in 1965, Chinese gradually became more important and today, knowing how to read and write Mandarin is a considerable asset in view of China's prominence in the economic world today and since her entry to the WTO. In our schools, Chinese is compulsory and most Chinese students are effectively bilingual in English and Chinese and some better students take on a third language of the first world countries like French, German, Japanese, etc.

    In a multi-racial society like Singapore, knowing how to speak the languages of the three major racial groups is a political asset for politicians. At every National Day Rally, our past-Prime Minister, Mr Lee Kuan Yew and the present PM, Mr Goh Chok Tong, speak in Malay, Mandarin and English. At this year's Rally, Mr Goh even spoke a little bit of Hokkien and Teochiew to capture the hearts of many. When Singapore was part of Malaysia, Mr Lee spoke in good Malay in Parliament and astounded many Malaysian MPs and the man-in-the street. The ability to communicate to constituents in their mother tongue must surely be a considerable asset!

    Our next PM designate, Mr Lee's eldest son, Mr Lee Hsien Loong is not only a brilliant scholar, he himself is a linguist, proficient in English, Malay and Mandarin and I was told in Russian and Japanese as well. I'm sure he must know his own mother tongue, Hakka.

    Yes, when we get older, we wished we had been taught our mother tongue as we reminisce our "Roots"! How else better can we convey to our children of our forefathers and their time.
     
    #14 Loh, Aug 26, 2003
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2003
  15. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    Re: The thread has changed: SORRY!

    Totally agree.

    The reporters can only write down what is "being" said (or worse, translated), without too much description about things like sign language, face expression, etc.

    As we all know, mis-understanding could come right away:

    1. Something in 1 language might be good, in another language could be bad.

    2. Different culture background could be the key. Something means self-confidence in one, might means totally no-respect in another.

    3. Using the same word, but with happy tone or angry tone might be 180' opposite.

    4. Sometimes, the reporters might not totally understand a joke, a tech. word, etc.

    5. Reporters might add their own feeling toward certain individual / group, when writing an article.
     
  16. Hugo

    Hugo Regular Member

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    Also, to me, if Chen Hong is cocky or conceited, then so be it. The only person who can judge him is the one who takes his #1 world rank. Since he is the current #1, then he can talk about himself all he want, because he got himself to that position. Remember 1.5 years ago when Chen Hong was not even chosen for the Chinese Thomas Cup team? His had a totally different attitude at that time, and even wrote an article in China Badminton stating his sadness and dissapointment in not being chosen. I think now his change in mindset (if he has become a lil "cocky") can be attributed to a sense of relief that he's back to top form and especially in S'Pore since he has not won a GP since last year's Danish Open.

    Good job and good luck Chen Hong.
     
  17. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Re: Re: The thread has changed: SORRY!

    I second and third that!

    Also nodding my head at that point of 'inferior' language. The ability to communicate more people should be viewed as an asset. (not just bad language either:))

    Occitan...now that's a language most people won't have heard of.

    Bbn is right. I can see my nephews and nieces in M'sia not being being able to speak Hokkien. Increasing emphasis in putonghua. But my cousin finds it useful on flights to Taiwan to communicate with the Taiwanese.


    Don't ask about me:( I'm a pure non-linguist...
     
  18. wilfredlgf

    wilfredlgf Regular Member

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    Loh's Languages & Dialects

    I fully agree with Loh there about Singapore as it has begun to really become like that over here in Malaysia as well, but definitely at a much slower pace. Places like KL will still use Cantonese as the 'main' dialect or Penang with Hokkien but the difference now is that we get to hear more and more spoken Mandarin now at these places in comparison to the years before.

    Dialect has its strengths in comparison to Mandarin and one of it is the 'community togetherness' feeling. Mandarin, as I view, it, is a 'national' or 'formal' language for Chinese descendants, so, it is usually used if one know not where the other person is from or what he or she can speak since it is the 'common' language. But when one suddenly speaks in the dialect native to the other person's hometown etc, there is that instant feeling of brotherhood/sisterhood/neighbourhood. (anymore more hoods to add?) in which one would find it easier to relate to one another. Suddenly, the formality disappears, and there is more friendliness, familiarity.

    This, is one advantage in PR that 'formal' languages cannot match.

    The reason why dialects are called low-classed is because most if originates from villages and communes, in which is native to the people of that geographical region. I fully agree that there is no such with inferior or superior language.

    To me, the most important thing is to get the message across. If the other person can understand what you want to convey, then that's good enough. One can speak perfect English but if the other person gets bewildered, it's simply ineffective.

    It is a pity, yes, as Bbn had pointed out that in the future dialects will likely to be 'phased out' as more and more new generation parents opt to speak Mandarin to their children, leaving only the older generations to carry the torch.

    That is globalisation, Asian-scale.
     
  19. Pecheur

    Pecheur Regular Member

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    Could we please split the language comments into a new thread? I think we've had enough comments about language before and it really isn't that relevant to this forum.
     
  20. Bbn

    Bbn Regular Member

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    Before we close this thread here's sth fr Msian younsters to read.

    Confirms what Loh said, and without good English and Mandarin,

    one will be handicapped esp in Business world, like Wilfred said,

    confined to one;s village.
     

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