Archery

Discussion in 'ATHENS 2004 non-badminton events' started by Dill, Aug 22, 2004.

  1. Dill

    Dill Regular Member

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    Am I right in assuming the bows are laser sighted?

    There is always a thing (technical I know :rolleyes: ) in the middle of the bow where the arrow sits that flicks down just before the arrow is loosened by the archer.

    I was wondering is the target sighted somehow by laser that flicks this thing and it tells the archer when it is time to release when the laser hits the bullseye?

    Either that or I'm going mad!

    If not, can someone explain what the hell the thing is and why it flicks down before the arrow flies?

    Please :crying:
     
  2. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    it could just be a good old optical sight

    allowing laser will be defeating the purpose of the whole thing....
     
  3. Matt Ross

    Matt Ross Regular Member

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    You read my mind! I have been watching that all the time and really dont know when it clips down just before the arrow is released. Mind you, archery in its self is quite amazing.

    I heard it is equivalent to hitting a melon from 5 tennis courts away!!!
     
  4. Dill

    Dill Regular Member

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    There shouldn't be any kind of sighting allowed, I remember doing longbow many years ago and it was skill as you had to hit up into the air because the target was so far away.

    The reason I ask is because the American guy's "thing" would not flick down and he never fired, that's why I think it is some kind of sighting mechanism indicator.

    Everyone that fires does so as this "thing" flicks.
     
  5. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    that's true. i cannot imagine the Mongolians or the Japanese samurai shooting an arrow with a sighting device on their bow....
     
  6. Pecheur

    Pecheur Regular Member

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    Yeah but you're also Scottish you believe that any good longbow should be carved by yourself from a limb of yew that was cut off by your father on the day you were born ;)
     
  7. economet

    economet Regular Member

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    No Lenses, No Laser!

    They just use a simple sight wich can be adjusted.
    A laser or telescopic sight would not help at all because the arrows fly in a curve. Arrows are sensitive for wind. Totally different from shooting with bullets flying straight ahead where telescopic sights are allowed.
    That thing which looks like a huge sight is just a shock absorber.

    Competitors shoot standing, aiming to land their arrow in the smallest (the central) circle, 12 cm in diameter, on a target face 122 cm in diameter, placed 70 m away. The target consists of ten coloured concentric circles known as ‘rings’.
     
  8. Pecheur

    Pecheur Regular Member

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    Actually contrary to popular believe bullets are quite wind sensitive, and bullets also fly in a curve, of course these factors are to a much lesser degree than with archery, however you can really notice it at distances greater than 100 metres.
     
  9. Dill

    Dill Regular Member

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    Never heard that one before, I know they can be marginaly affected but does the rifling of gun barrels not make this minimal?

    And never heard of the tree thing for a bow, maybe for the English since it was their weapon of choice in medieval times, I think the Scots prefered big swords that they could only just lift :rolleyes: wonder how that worked :confused:


    I thought the huge rod out the front along with the two sticking out the sides were counterweights :confused:
     
    #9 Dill, Aug 22, 2004
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2004
  10. Dill

    Dill Regular Member

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    So what is that thing that flicks down then?

    Can you give a name other than "thing" ? Everytime I see it I get visions of severed hands! ("Adams Family" joke)

    And more to the point why does it flick down?

    And why does it flick down just before the archers shoot?
     
    #10 Dill, Aug 22, 2004
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2004
  11. Zaquesquatch

    Zaquesquatch New Member

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    Archery device

    This topic may be ages old, but stumbled on it. The device you are asking about is called a clicker. Nothing to do with the sight, which is not laser. The clicker is simply a strip of metal that is pulled out over the arrow shaft when you put the arrow on the bow. The strip then has tension, wanting to return to it's position against the bow. When the archer reaches full draw, he or she pulls the tip of the arrow throught the clicker, allowing it to snap back to the bow, which makes the noise. They use it as a signal that they have reached their usual draw and are now ready to release the arrow when aimed properly. You set up the clicker based on how far back you draw the arrow when you anchor it by touching the string to your chin and tip of your nose. The clicker just helps ensure that this draw length is always the same, as the farther back you draw, even by fractions of an inch, the more power is transferred to the arrow, and if not the same each time, the arrow flies differently. Hope this makes sense.
     
  12. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

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    You're a good lurker.
    I didn't stumble onto this thread.
     
  13. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    Yeah, the clicker is a good idea.

    The best device for the modern compound bow shooter is the arrow release device.
     

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