what is your partner doing?

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by piclic77, Feb 22, 2005.

  1. piclic77

    piclic77 Regular Member

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    Sometimes its not obvious what my partner is doing when the shuttle is hit to him. I waste time looking over to see what kind of shot and where it is hit to the other side. Once i do that, i can get ready for any shot but the problem is that i wasted time looking over to perpare for that shot. Is it a matter of trusting your partner or being prepared for any shot , smash , drops drive, and clears :confused:
     
  2. jamesd20

    jamesd20 Moderator

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    As discussed in this thread:

    http://www.badmintoncentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=21308&highlight=danger


    It is dangerous to look behind when playing badminton, beacause situations develop very quickly.


    In order to anticipate which shot is likely from your partner you need to know:


    1. The shot previousley played by your partner

    This is important beacause you need to know whether your partner is in position or not. If your partner had to run across the court to play a cross court drive, and is still out of position, it is likely that you should anticipate him not to be able to attack strongly, and maybe even defend. Accordingly you should judge on your positioning as to whether you stay in front, take a step backwards, or move back fully to play side by side formation

    2.The return shot by your opponents/their style of play

    This is important as if your opponents had been dragged out of position from the previous shot by your partner, then you realise you are in a more attacking role. You may also know something of their style (do they like to block/drive/lift smashes mostly?) This will help you decide which shot is most likely and prepare your self for that shot relative to the likleyhood of them playing it.


    3.An idea of your partners usual replies/style of play

    Does your partner always attack? does he usually use drops before a big smash? are his smashes normally flat or are they steep? do he have a tendency to clears sometimes?are his drops fast or slow? These are questions you need to ask yourself and again calculate their probability to give you the best chance and intercepting the shots.

    4.What tactics (if any) you had discussed with your partner before the game

    Did you tell him to play any particular shots before the gaem? if so this will influence the probabilities as mentioned in point 4.



    In reality, these things can mainly be discovered through experience. But experience is useless unless you recognise it, and learn from it. After a game analyse what went right/wrong and why. When you watch players play analyse what they are doing right/wrong and why.


    Although they can be utilised by anyone these techniques are advanced, and best understood when you have a good grasp of the basic strokes/footwork, and have an appreciation of the advantages/disadvantages of these techniques in their application.
     
  3. frankcent

    frankcent Regular Member

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    I dont look no matter who my partner is. I once teamed up with someone played with a racket that had a broken string. I could do nothing about it even if I look. I would prefer getting read for the next shot.
     
  4. outlah

    outlah Regular Member

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    Can you tell what return your opponents are going to make by looking at your partner's shots? If you can do that, then you can surely know what kind of shot your partner is going to make by seeing what the opponent does, without having to look back at your partner. Does that make sense?

    Looking at your partner might also be a sign that you're unsure about your own abilities. :p
     
    #4 outlah, Feb 22, 2005
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2005
  5. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    1. Even in singles, which u r totally on ur own, u should not make a decision based on what u see, but need earlier anticipation about the next stroke. Such anticipation will improve when u get more experience, and willing to think.

    2. You need to trust ur partner, no matter what his/her skill lvl is. If s/he knows what should do, u should know the following moves, as james stated in his post. If s/he is more like a beginner to u, even say u look, think, and even "tutor" them on court, u can't really help with the situation.

    3. Never look back, as it's very dangerous. I know ppl got hit by shuttles or even rackets, by their partner.
     
  6. piclic77

    piclic77 Regular Member

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    I see what your saying, but what i am getting at is not my confidence in my own abilities. I m not sure what/where the shots are going. Ex, if he clears it to the back and the opponent smashes it because it was weak clear, then i will be possibily out of position, playing a drop or drive instead of helping my partner defending a smash.

    Could i be looking into it too much. If it is a weak clear i should just let him handle the smash? let him defend it :D

    I think whats best is just trusting the partner, anticipate and learn as i gain more experience. thanks again for all yor help.
     
  7. Matt Ross

    Matt Ross Regular Member

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    Jamesd20 has it right on the head

    You have to know the persons repatour (sp?). Do they favour smashes, punch clears etc. The idea is you should feel what you will play in that situation. Thats the difference between good pairs and excellent pairs. Those are the ones that understand eachothers game so well they know where their partner is going to hit it.
     
  8. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    1. You can see the "result" of the stroke much easier, when u look forward (where the shuttle lands, or to be land) with some anticipation.

    2. You look backward, u might be as well tricked by ur own partner. Let's say s/he has good strokes, how u tell s/he excute a smash or over the head slice? Never have to metion, u look backward, usually with an akward angle.

    3. If by looking backward, u see everything clear, u will have much less time to react to opponent's return, as u have to turn ur head (or body) back, recover the balance, then defend.

    4. Look at the opponents, to see what their reaction is, and anticipate what they probably will do. Also, see their location and movement, and which spot is the "wide open" area for ur attack. All these require u to look forward, but not worry about ur partner.
     
  9. manduki

    manduki Regular Member

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    I had this problem with my new partner a few months ago. I had no clue what my partner was going to do therefore, didn't know the range of shots the opponent can perform. However, eventually when you play for around a month or so with them, you begin to sorta trust them and anticipate the shot they will do. :D
     

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