Shouting/cheering at opponents errors

Discussion in 'Rules / Tournament Regulation / Officiating' started by speedyJT, Oct 28, 2013.

  1. gundamzaku

    gundamzaku Regular Member

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    7 stupid cousins! hahahaha, as soon as i read that i couldn't stop laughing. it's pathetic of them to do that since you've mopped the floor with all of them. but you do face a very tough mental situation here and only mental giants would be able to come thru without having spectators like that affect your performance.
     
  2. y11971alex

    y11971alex Regular Member

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    Normally, I attempt to appear unemotional, but bits of emotion do "leak" from time to time. It's never really a good thing to let one's opponent perceive one as an emotional player.

    When I play a good shot, I usually just stay silent. When I play a bad shot, I look the other direction and roll my eyes or say, under my breath, "come on", "get it up" or suchlike. When my opponent plays a great shot, one that I've been expecting to win, I occasionally give a clap with my hand and racquet face, but not too frequently, as I think that dilutes the meaning of that gesture.

    When my opponent plays a really, really poor shot, such as a total air shot on a sure winner, I try, again, to be unemotional. Sometimes, I say "lucky me" to anybody watching, which usually was just a few people waiting to get on court in high school badminton club/team. If it's really that funny... well I can always bury my face in the racquet bag and cough to conceal the laughter.

    "What are you doing with your head in the racquet bag?"

    "Nothing, just sniffing the shuttles."

    There was one time when animosities between my teammate and myself grew greater than between the two teams. He went so far as to clap for the opposing team's good shots and jeer mine. So after the match, my teammate refused to shake my hand, but both of us shook the other team's hands. It was an embarrassing moment for me, but I think not shaking the opposing team's hands is far worse than not shaking your partner's hand.

    Strangely enough, apparently most other people shout "come on" when they win. I only shout "come on" when I lose the point (after all, what's the point of "come on" if you just won?)
     
  3. OhSearsTower

    OhSearsTower Regular Member

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    whats the difference of "yes" or "come on" in that situation??? It is exactly the same for me! Maybe a "yes" is even less bad because its simply honest (Yes-we scored an important point!) whereas a "come on"...why would i say come on to myself after service error of opponent?! makes no sense

    If I was your opponent, i would be more annoyed by constant apologizes than by shouts! Why do you apologize for something you do all the time anyway?! by purpose so to speak - makes no sense and would annoy me
     
  4. OhSearsTower

    OhSearsTower Regular Member

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    never in opponents direction! i think this is very offending! no matter after what rallye!

    I think shouting is part of the game, if its a competetive game players should feel free to "enjoy" their emotions. but not in the direction of you opponent in my opinion
     
  5. OhSearsTower

    OhSearsTower Regular Member

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    in general i think its a personal thing...nobody is the same..everybody has its own emotions and ways to express it...

    in a tight and important match i tend to shout things like "yes" or "come on"..but in a match with long exchanges it hurts me bad because i really suffer the oxygen loss from the shout! so i really keep the shouting to a minimum and rather take every millisecond to take deep breathes lol

    so usually im fistpumping to myself a lot then - halfway or completely turned away from the opponent



    it happened one single time in my badminton life that i experienced an opponent who i really thought was disrespectful and behaved very rude

    i did not shake hands with him
    its always seen as sore loser thing...but in my opinion shaking hands is a respectful gesture of thanking for the game
    if a player behaves like **** and i dont enjoy the game at all i think it is just honest to not shake hands!
    see it that way: if i shake hands (which i do 99,5% of the time) its an honest thank you! with worth and not because "i have to"
     
    #25 OhSearsTower, Oct 20, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2015
  6. Quentin11

    Quentin11 Regular Member

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    What do players shout though?

    I always hear 'Shooo' etc ... any ideas?
     
  7. raymond

    raymond Regular Member

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    Personal experience - a few years back when my daughter was still very young (14, perhaps). She played in a local tournament facing an ex-professional player in WS. The opponent certainly was already in her 30's, possibly even 40's. It's clear this pro was way above my kid. At one point, when she made a mistake and lost a point, my wife cheered our kid and yelled "yes!". This pro lost her temper, and almost wanted to throw her racket at us, and stomped out of the court. A few things went wrong. As a pro, I expected her to handle herself better in a match, focusing more on her games than what happened around her. Also being a pro against a kid, her behavior demonstrated her shallowness!
     
  8. juneau-AK

    juneau-AK Regular Member

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    So here are my considerations:
    Weekend? check.
    Club clash? check.
    Opponents claim others' response to error not fair.
    Teammates behind are off the court? Check.
    You won the match.
    You said sorry for your cheering.
    You thanked opponents for a good game.
    Sportsmanship is important to you.
    You hesitate to compare. Check​

    When you are saying sorry after the match, it is a tad too late. The timely opportunity was when the opponent made the unfair claim.

    It was not a good game for the opponents, was it? They lost. Better response would be just thanks. Best response would be to buy them their favourite drink.

    In a club match, you see each other more often. Remember your sportsmanship? Use that. You may suddenly have a new BFF instead of all that happened.

    For me, whenever there is a 'but' point made, it is contradictory to what followed earlier. And since everyone in the world is doing it, does not mean you should too. Let your individuality and humility shine on the club courts.

    Not many responders of this forum where there. However, it appears that you are seeking justification of your action from them, a validation of your behaviour. The best persons are the ones who were across the net from you. Nothing much lost, you could still make amends immediately the next time you see either of them. The very same description you used, that you knew their teammates were clapping with your errors, that you are competitive, that they bring out the best in you, and all that.

    I thank you for the opportunity you provided to respond; taking my opinions hat off and will now wear asbestos briefs. Flame away.
     
  9. Borkya

    Borkya Regular Member

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    Yeah, I'll admit I didn't know this was a controversial topic! Here in China it is totally fine to get excited and shout when your opponent makes an error. In a competition or friendly match it is the same.

    Although in a friendly match do you guys ever say a sarcastic "Thank you" when your opponent hits the net in a serve or does some other dumb mistake? I think I read in some post long ago that some people hate that, but where I play we all do it all the time and it's kinda just funny banter.

    Or, when your opponent makes a mistake we sometimes yell out 自己人 which means like, "one of us" in a way to joke your opponent is actually on your team helping you out.

    Of course that is all just good nature ribbing with people you know. But in a serious game, like a competition against strangers, it is perfectly acceptable to shout a victory yell when your opponent makes an error. Didn't know that was considered rude in some places. Interesting!
     
  10. Rob3rt

    Rob3rt Regular Member

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    Here in Germany it's frowned upon. Even clapping from spectators when the opponents made an unforced error is considered bad.
     
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  11. LenaicM

    LenaicM Regular Member

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    I used to be disturbed when my opponent or his teammates are cheering loudly at every single points even my own faults. In a tournament I did back in March I had two specific scenarios.

    In qualification, the girlfriend of a player who kept shouting "Allez Lolo c'est bien ça" - Lolo being a short for Laurent - for every single point! Including my mistakes. Sometimes even motivating him between rallies. I lost the first set being totally distracted.

    In semi-final I was leading 15 - 8 when my opponent started to throw some "brrrrrraaaa" at every points and sometimes during rallies. I called the judge because it distracted me. Apparently not much could be done and I got even more distracted by breaking the rhythm of my own game when calling that judge and discussing things for a few minutes with him. To make matters worse, after the first set, his whole team cheered up so loud for him. I lost the semi-final in two straight sets after leading the first set quite comfortably. I got also very tired on this match but I believe I got too distracted.

    On the spot I was not upset but felt like I lost because of that. After giving it some second thoughts the next day, with a rested mind, I think I was just inexperienced enough to let it go to my mind and I believe one should isolate himself/herself when confronted to this kind of situation. It is so frustrating right, but at the end of the day only ourselves are to blame if we loose.
    I make a point of remaining extremely calm now and just keep on and I think it works because it doesn't disturb me anymore, I guess it's all in the mind :D
     
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  12. psyclops

    psyclops Regular Member

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    Pardon me, do you mean United States, or all America?
    If latter, then it would be too many countries.
     
  13. whatsthecallUmp

    whatsthecallUmp Regular Member

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    To those who want to have some reading material on gamesmanship in sports, here is something that I liked, and is about using verbals, as written by the OP; refer case 2-12 herein - http://bit.ly/2WBkEbY
    (the link will expire after 4 weeks)
     

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