Energy Discussion

Discussion in 'Chit-Chat' started by wilfredlgf, Mar 27, 2011.

  1. Fidget

    Fidget Regular Member

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    The way the reporter, Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, describes it, this process is blessed with:
    huge reserves of product in stable friendly countries;
    bigger energy output per unit cost;
    absolutely fool proof against meltdown/ disaster.

    I would not have been surprised if he said its exhaust makes the countryside smell like lavender and lillies.:eek:

    Hopefully this truly is a better method of nuclear power. But nothing is perfect. Or perhaps I'm too inclined to agree with another Ambrose:
    "It is evident that skepticism, while it makes no actual change in man, always makes him feel better." - Ambrose Bierce

     
  2. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

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    Any man who quotes Ambrose Bierce in this day and age, deserves a double-take at the very least! :D
     
  3. RSLvictorSOTX

    RSLvictorSOTX Regular Member

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    Let's leave the anti-matter discussion to CUNY professor Michio Kaku, I'm sure he's more knowledgeable than us. Actually sat in on one of his lectures both in CUNY and NYU (visiting).
     
  4. wilfredlgf

    wilfredlgf Regular Member

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    RSL, I don't understand why we must leave it all to Dr Kaku.
     
  5. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

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    Here's a parallel I would like to draw.

    The international broadcast television industry had the HD 16:9 format ready to roll at least 10 years before it started being adopted in small vertical pockets around the world. But the sheer size of investment in Betacam and DV 4:2:2 would not allow them to adopt any radically new format. And it wasn't just the recording or broadcasting equipment. Post production, dubbing, MCR equipment, all of these had to conform. And finally, the last mile. Consumer equipment had to reach end-of-life. At the other end, infrastructure investment in manufacturing of broadcast, prosumer and consumer mass-produced equipment and accessories (even cables) also had to be recouped. How long was RG59 in use?

    The old analog color TV sets with standard def 4:3 composite signals were not supposed to exist at all. Their technology was based on monochrome sets. But the mistake (or compromise) was perpetuated. And they stuck around for decades. Economics dictated it, pure and simple. There was too much money and vested interest to just throw it out one fine day.

    You can draw a parallel to the fossil-fuel-based energy industry...
     
  6. RSLvictorSOTX

    RSLvictorSOTX Regular Member

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    Sorry, it was a retort to post number 20 by Pete_LSD (specially the anti-matter part).
     
  7. extremenanopowe

    extremenanopowe Regular Member

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    Nice house. I like.... ;)
     
  8. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

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    Meanwhile...

    U.S. public support for more nuclear power slips

    By Christopher Doering | Reuters – Tue, 22 Mar, 2011 8:30 PM EDT

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. public support for expanding nuclear power appears to be slipping after Japan's nuclear crisis while New York's governor said on Tuesday an aging plant near New York City will be the top priority in a federal review of earthquake risk to such facilities.

    The full story:
    http://ca.news.yahoo.com/put-brakes-nuclear-power-plants-lieberman-20110313-095447-648.html
     
  9. Avenger

    Avenger Regular Member

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    I agree, if it's Indonesia, especially in Jakarta I would migrate to Singapore or Australia
     
  10. Gicutzu

    Gicutzu Regular Member

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    Three experimental nuclear reactors have already been built in Yogyakarta, Serpong, and Bandung.

    Romania has a functioning nuclear power plant, and, to be honest, if Romania can handle it without blowing it up, then any country can do it :p
     
  11. Avenger

    Avenger Regular Member

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    the main problem is not about the power plant itself

    the main problem is the people
    Indonesian still cannot handle the nuclear
    it's like an alien for them
    they don't understand how harmful it is. some crazy people might even steal the uranium and think they could sell it for high price

    also, many people corrupt
    when you build a big project like this one that could cost you US $20 billion
    maybe they ask for 20 bill and only use 5 bill to build the powerplant
    which means a doom for everyone

    it is better not to build one in Indonesia until we ready to accept it
    until everyone not so stupid stealing iron so they can sell it
    until everyone understand how dangerous it is
    or at least until we don't have any resources left to use

    It seems I degrading Indonesian, but well, that's the truth
     
    #31 Avenger, Mar 29, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2011
  12. Avenger

    Avenger Regular Member

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    If Indonesia wants to build one, I would say Indonesia need expert from foreign country
    the company who build it should be from German, or somewhere else who has good engineer in nuclear power plant
     
  13. Gicutzu

    Gicutzu Regular Member

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    We have the exact same problems in Romania: people stealing anything made out of iron (including train tracks and stuff), corruption, etc. I guess we're lucky that the power plant was built during the Communist times when there was no corruption and no stealing. I'm surprised that it still works...
     
  14. extremenanopowe

    extremenanopowe Regular Member

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    Don't worry, the rich will be the first to get worried and they should be the first to oppose this. They have more to loose as you know what their mentality is... lol. Of course some will fly away to the moon. ;)

    There's a saying in everyday life about 'problem'. People will say.. what problem? Any problem bigger than japan now? They are so cool and not worried even though it has spread to southern states. ;) So, chill and relax. ;)
     
  15. wilfredlgf

    wilfredlgf Regular Member

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    What kind of mentality is that ENP, mind telling us? And maybe you can let us know how you connect that to the energy problem or nuclear power in general?
     
  16. red00ecstrat

    red00ecstrat Regular Member

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    couldn't agree more!
    three mile island and chernobl disaster were caused by people.
     
  17. red00ecstrat

    red00ecstrat Regular Member

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    Murphy's Law - Anything that can go wrong will go wrong!
     
  18. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

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    Alstom sees continued demand for nuclear power in India, China

    Alstom sees continued demand for nuclear power in India, China

    From: The Hindu Business Line.
    http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/companies/article1691898.ece?homepage=true

    New Delhi, April 12:

    Alstom S.A.'s chief, Mr Patrick Kron, said the nuclear incident in Japan could pose questions on the choice of electricity made by countries, but envisages continued demand in India and China for nuclear power in the long run.

    The company has a presence across all the segments of electricity generation equipment — thermal, hydro, nuclear and renewables.

    It is therefore “adequately hedged” in terms of being able to respond to demand, whatever shape it takes in terms of fuel choices, the Chairman and CEO of the €10.4-billion French power engineering and train manufacturer said in an interaction here.

    Across much of Europe and the US, the nuclear incident playing out at Japan's earthquake-hit Fukushima Daiichi station has provided opponents of nuclear power with their strongest arguments since the Chernobyl meltdown.

    Currently, one out of every three nuclear plants in the world runs on turbines supplied by Alstom, which is the third-largest power-equipment maker globally after General Electric of the US and Germany's Siemens.

    In India, Alstom is part of a three-way joint venture involving state-owned atomic generator Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd (NPCIL) and Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd to make large sized turbines for upcoming nuclear projects. Mr Kron said the venture was on track and gearing up to execute orders. It has already got an order to build two turbine generators with a capacity of 700 MW each that will be installed at Kalpakkam.

    Metro rail projects

    Mr Kron said the firm is also open to making acquisitions in India. Apart from new locomotive projects and refurbishment orders from the Indian Railways, the company is strongly focussed on metro rail projects across India, he said.

    Alstom has already bagged a Rs 1,471-crore contract to design, manufacture and commission coaches for the Chennai Metro rail project and is building a manufacturing unit there to supply coaches. “The Chennai manufacturing facility would be completed by early 2013,” Mr Kron said. He also hinted at plans to set up a wind power equipment manufacturing facility in India.

    Having started out in India way back in 1911, Alstom has marked the completion of 100 years in India this year and Mr Kron's visit here is to commemorate the landmark. “We have competition, we have opportunities… in the next 100 years we are going to generate more opportunities than the previous 100 years.”
     
  19. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

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    China’s nuclear freeze to last until 2012

    China’s nuclear freeze to last until 2012


    By Leslie Hook in Beijing
    Published: April 12 2011 18:47 | Last updated: April 12 2011 18:47

    Full report:
    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/68694fe0-6525-11e0-b150-00144feab49a.html?ftcamp=rss#axzz1JLcA5gpx

    Please respect FT.com's ts&cs and copyright policy which allow you to: share links; copy content for personal use; & redistribute limited extracts. Email ftsales.support@ft.com to buy additional rights or use this link to reference the article - http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/68694fe0-6525-11e0-b150-00144feab49a.html#ixzz1JLcbZuhZ

    Abstract:

    China, which accounts for 40 per cent of planned new reactors globally, halted approvals for new projects last month ...
     
  20. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

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    California Gov. Jerry Brown signs into law ambitious renewable energy mandate

    California Gov. Jerry Brown signs into law ambitious renewable energy mandate

    http://www.mercurynews.com/business/ci_17828401?nclick_check=1

    By Dana Hull

    dhull@mercurynews.com

    Posted: 04/12/2011 02:38:21 PM PDT

    California's cleantech economy took center stage Tuesday as Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law an ambitious mandate that requires the state's utilities to get 33 percent of their electricity from renewable sources by 2020.

    The move, which gives California the most aggressive renewable energy requirement in the nation, is expected to create cleantech jobs as utilities race to secure contracts with clean energy power producers.

    "Instead of taking oil from thousands of miles away we're taking the sun," said Brown before the signing ceremony at SunPower's (SPWRA) new solar manufacturing facility in Milpitas. "This is about California leading the country, and America potentially leading the world."

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu also brought good news Tuesday, and announced at the signing that SunPower and NRG Solar have been awarded a $1.2 billion conditional loan guarantee from the Department of Energy for the California Valley Solar Ranch, a 250-megawatt power plant in San Luis Obispo County. The solar plant is expected to create 350 jobs and generate enough power for 60,000 homes.

    "The efficiencies created by the California Valley Solar Ranch project will help lower the cost of solar power and encourage more utility-scale solar deployment," said Chu. "The project will also create hundreds of jobs and will generate clean, renewable power to fulfill increased energy demand."


    San Jose-based SunPower designs and manufactures solar cells and solar panels for residential, commercial and utility clients. The company has more than 5,100 employees worldwide, including about 4,300 in the Philippines, where SunPower has two factories near Manila.

    But with the solar market in California rapidly expanding, SunPower is eager to manufacture closer to home and recently opened its first domestic solar manufacturing facility in Milpitas. The Milpitas factory is operated in partnership with Flextronics, an electronics manufacturing services provider, and is expected to create 100 jobs.

    Under current California law, the state's three largest utilities are required to procure 20 percent of their power from renewable sources. In 2009, former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed an executive order that raised the bar to 33 percent by 2020.

    But Brown's signing of the law--his first major legislation since taking office--carries far more weight than an executive order. It also extends to all utilities in the state, including municipal utilities in Palo Alto, Santa Clara and Sacramento.

    "This is going to electrify California's economy and reduce air pollution and global warming," said Jim Metropulos of the Sierra Club, which has been advocating for the law.

    Renewable energy sources like solar, wind, biomass, geothermal, wave and tidal power and small hydroelectric dams all count toward meeting the law, called the "Renewable Portfolio Standard.'' Utilities can use a mix of renewable power sources to meet the new goals. Solar power is expected to be a big winner.

    "Solar is much more valuable to utilities," said Adam Browning of the Vote Solar Initiative in San Francisco. "The sun shines during the middle of the day, which corresponds to peak demand."

    The renewables law was also heralded by consumer advocates, because it contains provisions designed to protect consumers from rising and often volatile fossil fuel prices and requires state regulators with the California Public Utilities Commission to approve any renewable energy contracts.

    "We'll make sure that ratepayers are protected," said CPUC Commissioner Mike Florio, who was a consumer advocate for three decades. "Part of our charge in implementing the bill is establishing cost control measures."

    Tuesday also marked a big victory for State Sen. Joe Simitian (D-Palo Alto), who has pushed for the 33 percent standard for four years.

    "We want the commitment to renewable energy to be real, but we also want the flexibility to make it work," said Simitian. "If we send a clear signal to the market, the market will respond--with investment, tax revenue and jobs."
     

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