Doubles - how to serve someone who crowds the net

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Playfair, Mar 2, 2019.

  1. Playfair

    Playfair New Member

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    How do I serve someone who crowds the net and immediately pounces on it for an instant point? Opponent is tall with long arms and can drive or drop the shuttle with great control. A flick serve puts you in immediate danger of eating a birdie sandwich. Help!
     
  2. thyrif

    thyrif Regular Member

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    Sounds like you need some good variation in the serve, and place it maybe near their racket shoulder as that is a harder place to control the shuttle.
    Also, when you serve low enough, attacking it is hard. Make sure the shuttle is moving downwards as it passes the net very close. This is very hard for them as they expect to hit it near the net but you make it impossible and they have to start using magic to get it back over. This requires some serious practice, though!

    Also be ready for any short netshots, your partner need to pick up the faster shots to the middle or back.

    Hope it helps a bit!
     
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  3. xzavire

    xzavire Regular Member

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    A couple of suggestions

    1. Practice and practice your serve. Get it tight to the net and minimize the angles. You need to practice it to have confidence in doing it while under pressure. The muscle memory needs to be there.

    2. Vary the short serve location. Serve to the T and mix it up out wide. A little unpredictability goes a long way sometimes.

    3. Back up a half step and flick higher. You know he’ll attack it but it’ll make him think twice before preemptively attacking the short serve. Vary the location of the flick as well. At the same time if you and your partner are mentally committed to defending in the beginning it’s less of a disadvantage.

    4. Purposely serve short a bit. If he is rushing very eagerly he may not notice the short serve. Serving a bit short gives him a harder time in attacking.

    Hope this helps
     
  4. Budi

    Budi Regular Member

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    1. Serve as low as possible. Really close to the net & drop at the right at the service line. Take abunch of cork, & repeat serving. When out of cork, move to other side of court & do the same again & again.
    2. Practice variety of serve. Low, flick, left to right drop position. That would makes opponent think where would u drop the bird & makes him harder to cut the bird. Wrong guest will put him on rather bad return.
    3. The most important is mental ready. Yes his net cut is scarry but if u already had mental drop, then u already loss the game. As u serve prepare urself & ur friend to recieve his cut. U know its coming & it will come. So dont being eaten by ur own fear but brave urself & prepare for counter.
     
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  5. DarkHiatus

    DarkHiatus Regular Member

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    You serve to them like you'd serve to any other player!

    That is, with a tight serve to the net (<5cm over) and to the service line (within 10-20cm of whichever part you are aiming for).

    You need to put time and effort into learning to serve - it doesn't just happen overnight. If you ask a fresh beginner to serve against a professional, you can bet 99% of those serves are going to be buried or as you put it, become a birdie sandwich.

    Only by practice will that fresh beginner ever get a serve that can neutrally start a rally against a professional/higher level player.
     
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  6. yf19-sama

    yf19-sama Regular Member

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    Honestly those kinds of receivers are awesome MD training partners, you can learn that controlling both the height and the side angles makes the biggest difference.
    Another important factor is the TIMING, sometime an extra delay can really mess up the quality of their return.

    You have also the option to serve flat above the non racket shoulder (by serving 1 or 2 foot back to ensure the bird pass the net)

    Solution Bonus : Learn the K.Sanjaya/Lee.Y.D. spin serve.

    Like any strokes the most difficult is not to learn the good shot but to UNLEARN the bad habits one is stuck with..
     
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  7. raymond

    raymond Regular Member

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    Enough tips had been given by others about technicality. I'd like to add two ideas here -

    1. Trust your partner - no matter how good your serves are, there'd be players who could attack them. If you're the only one that practices, this may not be enough.
    2. Trust yourself - be mentally strong, and maintain control of your muscles/services.
     
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