Deception/Hold/Flick

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by BadJY, May 27, 2007.

  1. BadJY

    BadJY Regular Member

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    I've seen many players do the hold and flick shot, but everytime it gets me.
    Everytime I try to do it it's really evident if I'm going to do a flick or a netshot. And when it's not evident the flick doesn't go far enough to destabilize my opponent. I have trouble with deception at the net overall.

    A friend told me that you need a lot of wrist strength to do this shot, and a lighter racquet would be preferred.

    Is it a question of wrist strength/technique or it's something else?
     
  2. Abe Sani

    Abe Sani Regular Member

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    It's about patience (timing) and experience in using it coupled with wrist strength (or use of thumb), in my opinion. It really depends on your opponent. For me I think I personally play better at the net when I play singles than I do in other places around the court. Knowing that, some of my friends that I play with will sometimes come up earlier to anticipate a drop, or move up as a reaction when I hold my racket up at the net getting ready to drop.

    I guess the key timing and being comfortable with it (experience). You really have to be able to watch your opponent and decide from the way they move as to if you're going to drop it, or if they move forward enough, if you're able to push it to the back court.

    I first started learning to do things like this when I watched a Vietnamese friend of mine doing it a while back, and from there I was able to kind of observe how he did it. It might help to just observe for now and try putting it to use whenever you can get the chance.

    Hope it helped, I'm sure there are better players out there who can give you a better answer though!
     
  3. cappy75

    cappy75 Regular Member

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    It's in the fingerpower and how relax you are when you execute the flick. When you're at the net, you don't need to flick too far to reach the baseline.
     
  4. Abe Sani

    Abe Sani Regular Member

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    Yeah that's very true. On my backhand side I only need to use a little bit of thumb and my fingers with a tiny bit of wrist. Forehand side I guess is fingers + wrist for me. But again the key is deception I guess. First get used to how much power you need and the technique of the shot, then I guess after that comes when to use it and learning to time it right.
     
  5. jrmanu

    jrmanu Regular Member

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    hey

    you need to have a strong wrist and the proper techinue. and you can only do deceptive shots in some occasions . if not it will just be a waste.
     
  6. BadJY

    BadJY Regular Member

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    Is it true it is easier with light headlight racquet?
     
  7. jrmanu

    jrmanu Regular Member

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    if

    if your already use to the racket it realy doesnt matter
     
  8. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    One way to improve this shot is to practise the technique and train the explosive strength of your arm/wrist/hand.

    Remember, however, that the shot will be much more effective, and easier, if you are taking it early -- closer to the top of the net, rather than farther away from the net and nearer the ground.

    So footwork and speed of movement are important, but it's also helpful to have a good tactical understanding for when to use the shot.

    The aim of the shot is to deceive or delay your opponent to the extent that he is later to the shuttle or doesn't reach it at all. With this in mind, you should play the shallowest flick that you can get away with.

    If it is too shallow, then he may be able to intercept with a block jump. His likely response would be a steep half-smash from the midcourt -- in other words, you've set him up for an attempted winning shot.

    If it is too high, then much of the venom is lost from your shot. He will have more time. Also, the higher the lift, the more power you need to reach the baseline. Therefore a high lift is less deceptive than a shallow lift: you need more power, so you can't use such a short swing.

    As for the racket: it shouldn't matter much unless you have a very heavy/head-heavy racket.
     
  9. huynd

    huynd Regular Member

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    For me the hardest part is being able to relax, and set up well for the shot - we should keep our opponent flat footed. Secondly, it's the precision. Flick action is very quick and it`s difficult to send the shuttle exactly where we want to :)
     
  10. cappy75

    cappy75 Regular Member

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    Not really, like Gollum said, it's not just to catch them flat footed or trick them. It's merely to delay their responses especially when they're very fast players, the key being that the lift should be just right to stretch them. The hold and flick should only be a secondary option, the first being a netshot because the netshot is safer and also because the less you use the hold and flick the more effective it can be.

    Unless you're playing high level players or professionals, you're unlikely to find any opponents who could rush back to smash a decent hold and flick.

    Precision comes with practice;).

     
  11. Nikchan

    Nikchan Regular Member

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    agree. the best flick shot at the net is a shallow, attacking shot which is low, but is fast. jus get it high enough so that your opponent cant intercept it with a jump. and that should be sweet.

    however, before attempting this, make sure that you observe your opponent, and wat he's doing. if he anticipates the drop, then u can go for the flick but if not, then there is basically no point. if you go for the flick and he is ready for it, you will be the one with a disadvantage cos you have to run back to the centre in time for his smash, which is the most likely return because your flick is shallow.. the longer you wait before the flick, the more higher its going to go if its close to the net. because the only way that u can hit the bird up wen its so near to the ground is straight up..therefore, this usually doesnt work with a close drop.

    changing direction with the flick is also very helpful and useful..even if your opponent is reasonably ready for the flick, it will be harder to move saideways and back at the same time rather than just back. and yeah, its all about explosive wrist action and power. and yeah, as long as you are used to your racquet it doesnt matter, though flexible rackets may be a help.
     

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