Danger when Looking Behind!

Discussion in 'Injuries' started by Loh, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2002
    Messages:
    16,834
    Likes Received:
    905
    Occupation:
    Stock Broker
    Location:
    Singapore Also Can
    At our regular Sunday afternoon session, a friend was whipped on the forehead by his doubles partner when he turned his head to look at the shuttle which had gone past him.

    Admittedly, he was looking tired and relatively slow in his movements and despite the fact that he could not intercept the bird which sailed high towards the baseline, he chose to run backwards from midcourt and turn around. It must have been quite a knock although there was no visible mark on his forehead then. He retired rightaway. He could have been blinded in both eyes if the racket had struck an inch or two lower.

    The lesson to learn when playing doubles is:

    1. Try not to attempt to return the shuttle when it has clearly gone past you.

    2. Avoid the temptation of looking behind, especially if you know your partner is closeby.

    3. As a partner, be mindful of what your mate is doing as you can see his actions clearly, especially when you are standing behind.

    4. Restrain yourself and don't strike the shuttle if you know your partner is too close to you for you may hit him and cause severe injury or permanent disability. A point lost is nothing compared to injury inflicted on your partner, even though it is an accident.

    My neigbbour has stopped playing his favourite badminton game because more than a year ago, he was struck in the eye by the shuttle and is partially blind. I think his retina was detached and he sees double images.

    Prevention is better than cure if you want to continue to enjoy the badminton game.
     
  2. kwun

    kwun Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    40,558
    Likes Received:
    1,535
    Occupation:
    BC Janitor
    Location:
    Santa Clara, CA, USA
    very sound advice from Loh. i witnessed a similar accident a couple of weeks back. two guys got mixed up in the middle of a rally, one of the guy looked back and was hit square on his face. luckily the racket was flat when it contacted his face and he seemed to be ok afterwards. but it was a very close call indeed.

    an ex-coach of mine told us similar story that happened in the Chinese team, one guy looked behind and was blinded by the shuttle.

    very dangerous sport we are participating here... ;)
     
  3. jamesd20

    jamesd20 Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2003
    Messages:
    5,436
    Likes Received:
    3
    Occupation:
    Construction
    Location:
    Leeds, UK
    Sorry to hear this.

    I agree never look behind, even if you think it is safe.

    Also if you are at the back, and you see your partner coming back to hit the shuttle, then let him, he cant see you, so he wont pull out of the stroke, and if he does look behind and you hit it, he may get injured, as in this case.
     
  4. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    21,811
    Likes Received:
    21
    Occupation:
    Surfing, reading fan mails:D, Dilithium Crystal hu
    Location:
    Basement Boiler Room
    u can look back but only if YOU KNOW EXACTLY WHAT YOU ARE DOING and accept the chance of injury.

    I witnessed last week a beginner lady partnering (XD) wif an ex pro. Shuttle hit her eyeball dead on. She was lucky as she was only partially blinded for 1 day.

    the solution is very very simple,

    * wear eye protection, it's cheap and it works *
     
    #4 cooler, Jan 31, 2005
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2005
  5. roby2003

    roby2003 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Ontario
    This is the main reason why I inform my partner not to look back if the shuttle passed him/her.
    Getting injured is not worth the point won.
    This is a rule I adhere to when playing with beginners.
    Getting hit at the back of the head is painful enough for few minutes, imagine getting hit in the face in full force.
     
  6. Tomsk

    Tomsk Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2002
    Messages:
    246
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    You should never need to look behind.

    If you've left the shuttle you're expecting your partner to play it and you can follow the shuttle's motion by observing your opponents and listening to the shot your partner plays.
     
  7. chickenpoodle

    chickenpoodle Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2004
    Messages:
    1,237
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    not everyone knows how to read the situation like so...
    it takes some amount of experience to be able to read the game by following the opponents movements and the sound of the racquet swing and the contact sound between shuttle and strings.

    then you have to remember not everyone is that aware of their immediate surroundings.
    and those who dont' trust their partners. ;)

    if i'm playing up front, i've figured out two effective and rather safe ways of looking behind you. you might want to give it a try sometime, althought it feels really awkward.
    it feels really second nature to be because of the time i've spent racing motorcycles. :eek:

    since when you're in front, you're usually crouched below net-tape region...
    to look behind, raise one shoulder a bit, tuck in your chin, and look out of the corner of your eyes.
    the second method which may sound even more queer, raise your elbow and look under your armpit... its well below the supposed trajectory of almost all returns that should end up going over the net.

    its mainly used when you're in mid-turn when the bike is already tipped over and you're hanging off the side. very simple matter to raise the inside elbow, and glace behind you, giving you a FULL VIEW of where everyone behind you is. from before the corner, to those entering the corner, and those immediately behind you.
     
  8. Ricearonie

    Ricearonie Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2004
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Toronto
    a similar situation like this has happened to me a couple of times while playing doubles. my partner would return the server and the opponent would clear to the baseline (where i'd usually be standing), and as i'm going up for a jumpsmash my partner would decide to chase the shuttle down. at this point i would already be in mid air with my arm back ready to swing.

    luckly i was able to turn my body (back towards the net) and i guess "land safely" on the ground after a mid-air collision :eek:
     
  9. smash_master

    smash_master Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,579
    Likes Received:
    2
    Occupation:
    player/coach/student
    Location:
    Trinidad & Tobago / Calgary
    yeah thats what i usually do i just turn my head until my chin hits my shoulder gives me a nice view out of my eye depends on which way i turn though but i usually only do that if the shot seems unusually high in a smash or drive and if it would go out but if they clear it then of course im not going to turn around i will just take a quick glance if it goes right to one side and i would look at my partner to see what hes doing clearing,droping, or smashing cause if he clears i want to know so i can get to the other side of the court and get ready incase they smash...but some of the people i play with end up smashing into the net and it can get close even though im crouched down just seeing the shuttle come flying by you so close maby even feeling it pass sometimes i wouldent want to be looking behind me when that happens it might not go past might end up getting hit in the face.
     
  10. ants

    ants Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2002
    Messages:
    13,172
    Likes Received:
    34
    Occupation:
    Entrepreneur , Modern Nomad
    Location:
    Malaysian Citizen of the World
    I was worried there for a while.. kind of feel bad about it since i'm the one that returned the shot. Good thing that guy was ok.

    Its a very good advice from Loh indeed.
     
  11. j_e_thompson

    j_e_thompson Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Messages:
    123
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Software Engineer
    Location:
    Herts, UK
    I tend to agree. If I think I can't reach the shuttle, I duck and shout "yours".

    (I then usually listen to the sound of a racquet being whipped through the air at high speed and the sound of the shuttle bouncing off of the floor :D )
     
  12. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2002
    Messages:
    16,834
    Likes Received:
    905
    Occupation:
    Stock Broker
    Location:
    Singapore Also Can
    Yes, I think this is a very good practice and sound advice.

    I'm sure you've encountered a partner who just stand rooted on the floor without uttering a word even though the shuttle has flown very close to him. He isn't fast or alert enough to return the shuttle and makes no attempt to move away from his position nor will he alert his partner to it. It is extremely difficult for his partner to return the shuttle under such a disadvantageous situation when being blocked by his teammate and as in the case I have mentioned, an accident or a clash of rackets can result.

    Cautioning or alerting your partner in a doubles game is welcomed even in a situation when the shuttle is going out but your partner is unsure with his own judgement as he is moving and the lights may be in his face. A reassuring shout "OUT" can often relieve him of subsequent embarassment or loss of the rally or a point. It is pointless to accuse your partner with a sarcastic remark afterwards, such as "Why do you hit the bird when it is going out?" "Are you blind?"

    So a friendly call or reminder like "YOURS" or "MINE" can help to dispel doubts and reaffirm confidence and make the doubles game a more enjoyable one. :D
     
    #12 Loh, Feb 2, 2005
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2005
  13. charzord

    charzord Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2004
    Messages:
    393
    Likes Received:
    2
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    markham, canada
    I have to admit, that sounds pretty retarded to do during a mathc, BUT IT WORKS!! Unless your partner intentionally tried to aime for the little hole under your armpit, you pretty much safe. Thanks for the great advice my fellow canadian!!!
     
  14. Jinryu

    Jinryu Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2004
    Messages:
    463
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Librarian, RacketsportsMontreal.ca owner
    Location:
    Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Singly, I find that this is one of the simplest yet most overlooked aspects of the game... verbal communication.

    Sure, i suppose it does look rather impressive when a doubles team gets the wins without having to say a word to eachother, it looks very cool and very posessed and as if they've got perfect syncrhonization with eachother... but I find it even better (though less common) to see a team that has good communication, and by that I mean people who constantly communicate out loud (not just every once in a while) with their partners.
     
  15. speedy

    speedy Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2004
    Messages:
    181
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Malaysia
    Witnessed eye being hit by the shuttle once. Happened so fast. Quite a strong hit too. But the guy being hit is tough and continued to play. I would surely rest for a week.There is no need to look back. The partner at the back should be looking at what his partner is doing in front of him.
     
  16. Matt Ross

    Matt Ross Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2002
    Messages:
    1,223
    Likes Received:
    2
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    Essex, England
    I find if ever i need to see where my partner is for the second shot, then turning the head very slightly and glimpsing your oponent is the key, not a full on stare.

    A glimpse of where your partner is more than sufficient. Bare in mind, dont do this if your in a driving rally. Only safe to glimpse behind when the shuttle is in the first few stages o flight from a lift, for example.
     
  17. kwun

    kwun Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    40,558
    Likes Received:
    1,535
    Occupation:
    BC Janitor
    Location:
    Santa Clara, CA, USA
    chickenpoodle and Matt have it right. using peripheral vision is sufficient to gain awareness and miles better than turning around.
     
  18. cappy75

    cappy75 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2002
    Messages:
    3,502
    Likes Received:
    26
    Occupation:
    Depot Support Representative
    Location:
    Burnaby, BC, Canada
    Yup! Gotta know when and how to check your partner. Actually it's better not to look back. I have to agree with Tomsk here, if you have to look back... it's probably too late to save the point already:D. If you're worried about backing into your partner, the back player should know when to 'fill-in' the gap when the front player back up since s/he has the better tactical view of the court. Just don't back up straight when you're at the center forecourt... that would be a recipe for disaster:p.
     
    #18 cappy75, Feb 2, 2005
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2005
  19. tranvi007

    tranvi007 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2004
    Messages:
    101
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Made you look!!!

    Wow that a touching story... I do look back at times. But its usually trust. I don't look on every shot, but if i like wait and see no response then i look. But usually the shots are too fast and looking at each shot will sore out my neck.
     
  20. j_e_thompson

    j_e_thompson Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Messages:
    123
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Software Engineer
    Location:
    Herts, UK
    I sometimes play with a guy called Sean. I had to re-educate him about this because he used to shout "SEAN'S", which most of the time sounded like "IT'S YOURS". After some near misses, taught him to shout "MINE" instead :D
     

Share This Page